(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The First Regiment Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, United States Volunteers, in the Spanish ..."

Google 



This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on Hbrary shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 

to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 

to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 

are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other maiginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 

publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing this resource, we liave taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 
We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain fivm automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attributionTht GoogXt "watermark" you see on each file is essential for informing people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liabili^ can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 

at |http : //books . google . com/| 



982 tj^t Zoom 9ttt|^ot 



FROM HEADQUARTEEtS 

Bdng Seven Odd Tales picked tip during Service 
in a Militia Regiment in Time of Peace* 



FABLES OF FIELD AND STAFF 

Being Seven Other Odd Tales concerning Certain 
Happenings in the Same Regiment* 



Each volume^ cloth^ )2mo^ mailed^ postpaidt on 
receipt of price^ $L00^ by 

THE COLONIAL COMPANY 

(P.O. Box J6J2) 

Boston 



^, 



*' t i 



« 



. ♦ . 



^ i; 



:;-:ii'^ «.,. ; 



p ». \ 



^.•m' ■ ■■ 



-• <' \- .-. ■• 



» . ^ - 



' i'i.l ": 






. / 



I V 



I •' 



THE 

FIRST REGIMENT 

)a$$dcbu$em l^eavv Jitiilkry 

UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS 



[SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR OF 



COLONEL JAMES A. FRYg, A.I.G., MASS. 

(UlTZ major or i^«|^(^imimt) 

MI MuMBcIiiisgttB MilltBT7 HistofMnSodcly; Associate Mcmbei United 

Stuct Umteij Service Institution; Aiisnciate Member United 

Statu NaTOl Instilule; Late Secretary NatioDBl 

Defence AsEndatioa 



WITH BBGIMBNTAL ROSTER AND MUSTER-ROLLS 
FIFTEEN ILLUSTRATIONS 



BOSTON 

THE COLONIAL COMPANY 
1899 



Sfie jflrst 'Regiment 
(Da00acbueett0 tieav^ artillery 



"UlflUantfa" 



]Sg tlie Same Suti^or 



FROM HEADQUARTERS 

Being Seven Odd Tales picked tip dating Service 
in a Militia Regiment in Time of Peace* 



FABLES OF FIELD AND STAFF 

Being Seven Otfier Odd Tales concerning Certain 
Happenings in tlie Same Regiment* 



Each volumet dotfi^ S2mcv mailed^ postpaid^ on 
receipt of price^ $L00^ by 

THE CXDLONIAL CXDMPANY 

(PX>. Box mi) 

Boston 






WMOMx 



OIUMI fl^ "' 



THE 

FIRST REGIMENT 



md$$acbu$em l^eapy j\mi 



DNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS 



SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR OF iSgl 



COLONEL JAMES A. FR^, A.LG., MASS. 

(LATE UAJOR OF TB/^finSoitm) 

Ueinbec MflssHChnsetU MfHtary HistoflSlfsodety; Asioclite Mcir 

SUtes MUitar; Service Institution; Associste Membei Unil 

States NivbI Institute; Late Secretai? National 

Defence At^ociatioo 






Oopyright, 1890, 
Bt Jaus a. Fsn. 



PRESS OF 
BOSTON, U.8Jk. 



fft? jfatbec 



WHO ADTISBD UB KOT TO ENTER THE SKBTIOX 
Ain> WODLD HA.TE DISINHERITED 

MB HAD 1 HEEDED TTTH 
iDVlOK 



CONTENTS 



PA«B 

I. Intboductoby 3 

II. The Goast-Defenoe Pboblem in Massa- 
chusetts 13 

III. Mabching-Obdebs 21 

IV. Off fob Active Sebvicb 31 

V. The Eegiment at Fobt Wabben ... 47 

VL A Pebiod of Suspense 59 

Vn. Fbom " M.V.M." to " U.S.V.^' .... 71 

VJJLL Pebsonnel of the Eegiment .... 87 

IX. The Season of Eumobs 99 

X. Assignment to Stations 116 

xi. fobt pickebing and the " nobth- 

Shobe ^^ Defenses 129 

XII. FOBT EODMAN AND ITS GaBBISON • . . 151 

Xni. The Thibd Battalion at Fobt Wabben, 161 

XIV. Final Days in the Sebvicb 171 

XV. An Honobablb Eegimental Eecobd . 187 

eosteb and musteb-eolls 198 

Ghbonology of the Wab 253 



IX 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



Colonel CsABLEa Pfaff j'nntiap^ 

Kespondinh to the Call, 26 Afrtl, 1898 . . 
Bakbettb Battbkt, 15-inch Rodmans . , , 
Field and Machine Gun Battery . . , , 
LiEDT EN ant-Colonel Carle A. Woodruff , 

The Field, Staff, and Line , 

Channel Battery, 8-inch Eifles .... 
G-ABBiHON Encampment, Fort Piokekino . , 

Major Peblie A. Dyae 

Majoe-Spbqkon Howakd S. Deabino . . . 
Major Geokok F. Quinbt 



?.. 



» u 



••^i 



xiv Preface. 

whole — it has been identified for over a cen- 
tury with the making of American history; 
for, like the sturdy oak, the regiment may 
trace its growth from still vigorous roots 
which reach far back into the historic past. 
*'D" Battery (Roxbury Train of Artillery) 
was chartered in 1784, bearing upon its origi- 
nal muster-rolls the names of many veterans 
of the Revolution, and first seeing activg ser- 
vice in the Shay RebeUion of 1787; ^^G'' 
Battery (Boston Fusileers) dates its organiza- 
tion from 1786 and its record of active ser- 
vice fi-om the War of 1812; «K'' Battery 
(Boston Light Infantry) was first enrolled at 
the time of our brief naval war with France 
in 1798, and served with the coast-guard in 
1812. 

The story of the heroic work of the regi- 
ment in the Civil War already fills a volume 
by itself : Blackburn's Ford, First Bull Run, 
Yorktown, Wilhamsburg, White Oak Swamp, 
Fair Oaks, Savage's Station, Glendale, Mal- 
vern Hill, Second Bull Run, Chantilly, 
Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, 
Locust Grove, Spottsylvania — tremendous 
names like these may hint at the regimental 



■t^, 



•■■'I • 



xvi Preface. 

exacting requirements of efficient coast-de- 
fence, — the men of the First Massachusetts, 
like their comrades of the regular artillery, 
quietly stood to their guns during the time of 
possible peril, and as quietly returned to the 
routine of peace when that peril had passed. 
Time alone can fix the relative value of many 
things, and while that final adjustment is tak- 
ing place the regiment may rest content with 
its own consciousness of having carried out 
well and faithfully whatever orders came to it. 

JAMES A. FRYE. 
Boston^ 25 April, 1899. 



^^TROOV 



CTORY 



FIRST REGIMENT 

ma$$achH$ctts Fjeavy Jirtiller" 



UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS 



SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR OF 1898 



COLONEL JAMES A. FR\^, A.I.G., MASS. 

(I.ATB MAJOR OF t™;Sb«IM1NT) 

HcmbiT MiBsschnsttts Military HiaWf&rtSociety ; Assotiate Member UaitH 

SUUb MUlUry Service InstiliitloD; Ashociale Member United 

States Naval Institute; Late Secretary National 



WITH REGIHBNTAL ROSTER AND MUSTER-ROLLS 
FIFTEEN ILLUSTRATIONS 



BOSTON 

THE COLONIAL COMPANY 



The First Regiment 



Even today, aflter the lapse of but a year, 
it has become difficult, if not impossible, to 
realize the state of public feeling in Boston on 
that wet, raw day in April, 1898, when the 
First Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, then a 
militia regiment, marched solidly and grimly 
through the muddy streets on its way to Fort 
Warren. The sight of the long, blue column 
— officers on foot, men in heavy marching 
order — told more plainly than any telegraphic 
despatch that the long-expected wai* had come 
at last. Day by day the feeling of uneasiness 
in the cities and towns along the N'ew England 
coast had been growing in intensity. Bom- 
bardment insurance was being written, securi- 
ties and valuables were being removed from 
the safe-deposit vaults of shore cities to those 
of inland towns, while letters by the hundred, 
and delegations by the score were coming to 
the governors of coast States, praying for pro- 
tection against naval raids. As in 1812, and 
as again in 1861, the authorities at Washington 
were overwhelmed with petitions for the naval 
protection of local interests, and — even as in 
former wars — they were compelled to reply 
that the few ships of war on the navy list could 



Zhe f iret ^Regiment 



u 



tDfdilantfa " 



6 The First Regiment 

were two widely differing qualities ; but late 
in April, 1898, all this yet remained to be de- 
termined, and the memorable rush of the 
Oregon from the far Pacific bears witness that 
the Navy Department recognized the pre- 
ponderance that might be given by the addi- 
tion of even a single fighting-ship to our force 
on the threatened Atlantic sea-board. 

Of the result of a general fleet action the 
country had small doubt ; it was the possibiUty 
of sudden and unexpected naval raids that 
caused concern. The words of the English 
naval critic, Steevens, applied with tenfold 
force to our own case : ^^ It is tolerably obvi- 
ous that no superiority in the world could 
guarantee our whole empire against raids by 
hostile cruisers. A fast cruiser could break 
the closest blockade possible in the days of 
torpedo boats, and though she would stand to 
meet and be engaged by a cruiser or cruisers 
of our own, yet she would also stand to elude 
them. She might then shell or lay under con- 
tribution unprotected coast towns, destroy 
shipping lying in their harbors, or making for 
or from them, besides landing small forces to 
do serious, if not vital damage." And this 



8 The First Regiment 

and populous cities, practically was left at 
the mercy of any chance squadron of swift 
cruisers, or even — at least in the earlier days 
of the war — of possible raids by privateers 
or wandering torpedo-gunboats. There was, 
it is true, the hastily improvised and costly 
coast-patrol fleet, of something over forty 
vessels — monitor relics of the '60's, armed 
yachts, ferry-boats, and tugs — distributed 
along the coast at stations from Eastport to 
New Orleans, but this heterogeneous outfit 
was brought into existence rather for scouting 
than for fighting. As a factor in actual re- 
sistance to determined naval attack it called 
for no serious consideration, and as a matter 
of record its organization was not complete 
imtil the 16th of June, when the dreaded Viz-' 
cayUy with her sister ships, finally had been 
marked down and safely penned in the harbor 
of Santiago. 

It was evident that the coast States, in the 
impending emergency, must tmTi for comfort 
fi'om the Navy to the War Department, and 
it soon became most painfully evident that the 
prospect of obtaining any immediate aid from 
this quarter was far firom reassuring. This 



Massachusetts Heavy jirtillery. 9 

especially was true in the case of the New 
England States, and notably so in that of 
Maseachusette. To make a broad statement, 
modern defensive works, modern sea-coast 
guns, and trained artillerymen to man them, 
were lacking. In other words, the apathy of 
thirty years had borne its legitimate fniit: 
the Congressmen of New England — with 
honorable exceptions, like Senators Hawley 
and Lodge — while ever willing to exert them- 
selves in favor of " Protection " of the com- 
mercial variety, had been sublimely indifferent 
to their duty in providing protection of another 
and very vital sort, and their constituents, in 
consequence, were enabled to enjoy the sen- 
sation of a war-scare which was far from being 
unwarranted. For it did not require a high 
order of intellect to comprehend that thirty 
days wonld not suffice for the accomplishment 
of the work of ten years — nor, indeed, could 
any one furnish a satisfactory guarantee of 
even thirty days' freedom from attack. 



FIRST REGIMENT 

ma$$acftM$cm f)my JWillerT 



UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS 



SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR OF 1898 



COLONEL JAMES A. FRY^, A.I.G., MASS. 

C1.ATB MAJOR OF T^^^tt^ismtn) 

Member Huaachnielts Military Hi BiDfefi Society; AssodotB Member United 

Statu Military Service iDSIiluUorii Associate Member United 

states Kavil laslilute; Late Secretary Natloaal 

Defence Associatloa 

WITH REGIMENTAl. ROSTER AND MUSTER-ROLLS 

FIFTSEN UXUSTRATJONS 



BOSTON 
THE COLONIAL COMPANY 



n. 

T^AKLT in April, when war was in 

nent, Governor "Wolcott, with two 
cere of his staff, sat down to the study < 
war-map of the Massachusetts coast which Ij 
been prepared and carefully revised to i 
existing conditions. It is no exaggeration! 
say that this map fiimished material for 1 
most serious thought. The map pitilesB 
showed that from the Merrimac River, on l 
northern boundary, to the Taunton River, I 
the southern, there were on navig 



14 The First Regiment 

the enormous sum of $1,586,775,000 — surely 
a tempting bait for any adventurous naval 
commander in the service of a desperate and 
bankrupt enemy. 

But the map relentlessly showed more than 
this : it demonstrated the absolutely defence- 
less condition of this rich strip of coast. At 
Boston there were indications of a rudimen- 
tary defence ; at New Bedford stood the obso- 
lete granite walls of old Fort Kodman; Fall 
River was protected by the guns at Fort 
Adams and the batteries at Dutch Island ; 
but elsewhere along the coast there was not 
to be found even the pretence of preparation 
for the surely coming war. 

The obsolete defenses, however, were not 
alone in giving cause for grave concern. The 
question of manning them had to be con- 
sidered. As a matter of record, there were 
scattered along the coast from Fort Preble, 
Me., to Fort Trumbull, Conn., eight bat- 
teries — one Q^ F ") a light battery — of the 
Second Artillery, whose duty-strength on the 
16th of April may have been approximately 
six hundred men. There were but three of 
these batteries on duty on the Massachusetts 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



15 



coaet — "C" (Schenck's) and "M" (Rich- 
mond's) at Fort Warren ; " G " (Niles') at the 
yet incomplete battery at Long Island Head, 
Boston Harbor. Where more trained gunners 
were to be had was problematical. The bill 
providing for the organization of the Sixth and 
Seventh Regiments of regular artilleiy had 
been passed by Congress as late as March 7th, 
and these new commands were only in process 
of evolution. It was not until the 16th of 
May that the first of the newly raised batteries 
took station in !New England, and even then 
its standard of efficiency was low, owing to 
the heavy percentage of recruits in its ranks. 
The condition of affairs in Boston Harbor 
was most interesting. Here was a city with 
an estimated population of five hundred and 
fifty thousand ; with an assessed valuation of 
$1,013,750,000 ; with business interests to be 
reckoned by daily bank-clearings of |20,000,- 
000 ; with annual exports and imports of 
$189,879,839 — in short, the second seaport 
of the country in commercial rank. Naturally 
it would be expected that the general Govern- 
ment, which hardly could be ignorant of the 
enormous interests just shown, would have 



16 The First Regiment 

made some pretence at giving them adequate 
protection. But what were the grim facts in 
the case ? 

In 1886, the so-called Endicott Board on 
Fortifications — whose scheme of defence, with 
some minor modifications, still remains the 
standard project for the erection of our coast 
works —recommended an expenditure of $10,- 
910,250 for the defenses of Boston Harbor. 
This sum covered the cost of guns, mounts, 
emplacements, submarine mines, and a flotilla 
of eighteen torpedo-boats for local service. 
Large as it may seem, it yet represents a levy 
of but one and seven-hundredths per cent, on 
the assessed valuation of the property exposed 
at this port, and furthermore it was intended 
that its expenditure should be distributed 
through a period of ten years. How faith- 
fully this programme was carried out by the 
authorities at Washington may be shown by 
the following table, in which the first column 
of figures indicates the number of breech- 
loading rifles and mortars required by the 
complete scheme of defence, while the second 
exhibits those actually mounted for service 
during the late war: 



FIRST REGIMENT 

IHassacDusem fims Jliiflkff 



UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS 



SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR OF 1898 



COLONEL JAMES A. FRVg, A.I.G., MASS. 

{LATE MAJOH OF M^^^HBHT) 

HcDber MuMBChnsMts Military MisIofferfSodely; Associate Membtr UnlMd 

Statw MUitar; Service iDSlitutiDa; AsEoclate Member United 

Stite* Naval tastltulii Late SecieUt? Naliosul 



WITH REGIMENTAL ROSTER AND MUSTER-ROLLS 

FIFTEEN ILLUSTRATIONS 



THE COLONIAL COMPANY 



18 The First Regiment. 

actually had been declared, the garrisons of 
the three mam defensive positions of the 
harbor — Fort Warren, Long Island Head, 
and the Mortar Battery at Winthrop — aggre- 
gated less than two hundred and ^y officers 
and men for duty. 



MARCHING ORDERS 



III. 



\\/ Ji^LL aware of this condition of affairs, 
Governor "Wolcott thought it prudent 
— even before the actual declaration of wai* — 
to have his foot batteries assembled in the 
vicinity of the guns at which it seemed more 
than likely that their services soon might be 
required, and by his direction permission was 
isked from Washington to send the First 
leavy Artillery to Fort Warren, under State 
"orders. This request met with the prompt 
approval of the Secretary of War, and on 
Sunday, April 24th, there came to regimental 
headquarters orders from General Dalton 
directing the command to " hold itself in read- 
iness for immediate service in the defenses of 
Boston Harbor." 

It hardly need be said that this order caused 

little surprise to the officers of the regiment. 

From the day when the naval court of inquiry 

reported the destruction of the Maine as 

ne to external explosion, until the day that 



22 The First Regiment 

marching orders actually came, the command 
at any time could have reported for duty with 
fiill ranks, and on three hours' notice. It is a 
matter of official record that this regiment, for 
years, has been held in constant readiness for 
field service; the ^^ YigUantia " on the regi- 
mental badge has long stood for something 
more than an empty boast. As a strict matter 
of fact, though the . officers had been con- 
vinced that war could not long be averted, 
there had been but little extra effort made on 
that account, for but little remained to be 
done ; here and there battery rolls were judic- 
iously weeded, all alarm-lists received final 
and careful revision — and that substantially 
was all. On the recommendation of the Mili- 
tary Advisory Board, to be sure, enough 
recruits had been enrolled to bring the 
regimental strength up to twelve hundred, 
and these new men had been faithfuUv drilled ; 
but, as events proved, this labor was to result 
in small benefit to the regiment itself, though 
other commands ultimately profited by it. 

Matters now were moving swiftly enough 
to suit the most impatient, and there were 
many impatient ones among the officers and 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



23 



mar 
^day 



men of the Old First. On the 23rd of April, 
President McKinley had issued his call for one 
hundred and twenty-five thousand volunteers ; 
on the 24th, the regiment had been ordered to 
hold itself ready for instant response to march- 
mg orders; on the 25th, Congress resolved 
that a state of war then existed — and late 
in the afternoon of that day came tlie long- 
awaited summons to duty. 

"Colonel Charles Pfaff, commanding First 
Regiment Heavy Artillery, First Brigade, 
M.Y.M.," so ran the third paragraph of 
Special Orders, No. 42, from the office of the 
Adjutant-General, "will report with his com- 
mand, fully armed and equipped, to the com- 
manding officer at Fort Warren, for eight 
days' duty in the defenses of Boston Harbor." 
eight days' tour ? It was destined to be 

:actly two hundred and thi-ee days before the 
regiment should be released from the service 
on which it started under the order signed by 
General Dalton that afternoon. 

Colonel Pfaff was awaiting developments at 

the State House when the decision was reached 

call out the regiment, and the order was 

iven to him direct. Hastening at once back 



24 The First Regiment 

to the South Armory, he handed the order to 
Adjutant Lake, who lost no time in putting in 
motion the mobilization machinery which for 
years had been in readiness to meet just such 
an emergency as this. Quietly and system- 
atically the orders for assembly went out over 
the telegraph and telephone wires, until, in less 
than an hour, every officer of the command 
knew that the end of the long waiting had 
come. And then the non-commissioned offi- 
cers passed the word to the men of their squads, 
while staff officers hurried by rail to the stations 
of each of the out-lying batteries, to make sure 
that nothing was omitted in the carrying out 
of the final orders. Long before midnight, 
through their reports, the commanding officer 
knew that his regiment would be ready to 
march out with full ranks on the following 
morning. There was little sleep for officers 
or men ; many passed the night in their armor- 
ies, while those who returned to their homes 
spent the hours before daylight in making 
hurried arrangements for an indefinite absence. 
It would be idle to say that there was no 
excitement, for each armory was a seething 
whirlpool of enthusiasm; but in spite of it all, 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



25 



matters moved on methodically, and morning 
found the twelve batteries ready in eveiy re- 
spect for the mobiUzatJon. 

"With the early dawn, the batteries of the 
Third (Bristol-Plymouth) Battalion — years 
ago christened the " Cape " Battalion — formed 
at their armories for the march to the trains 
which were to transport them to Boston. Their 
departure was the signal for the wildest enthu- 
siasm in their respective cities. In Fall River, 
Brockton, Taunton, and New Bedford the 
same scenes were enacted: cheering crowds 
lined the streets, and the Grand Army veterans, 
cadet coips of the schools, and civic organiza- 
tions turned out to escort the departing 
troops. Very mnch the same sort of feeling 
prevailed in Cambridge and Chelsea; but in 
Boston — though excited crowds gathered 
about the great South Annory — there was 
no organized demonstration. 

By nine o'clock, the batteries of the First 
and Second Battahons were assembled in the 
South Armory, where they were joined, a 
quarter of an hour later, by those of the Third 
Battahon, just off their troop-trains. Arms 
were stacked in the great di'ill-hall, knapsacks 



26 The First Regiment 

were unslung, and ranks were broken for a 
brief rest, while a travel ration, with hot coflTee, 
was issued to the men, many of whom, in all 
probability, had been too excited to do full 
justice to breakfast at their homes. 

It was at this time that a fact developed 
which — though overlooked in the rush of 
events at the time — must be placed on record 
now to the credit of the regiment. It must be 
recalled that definite orders for assembly were 
received late on the afternoon of the 25th^ 
and that the men reported to their com- 
mands almost at daybreak on the 26th; re- 
calling this, it certainly should give cause for 
just pride to the friends of the regiment, as 
well as to those who in the past have labored 
long and untiringly for the efficiency of the 
militia of Massachusetts, that in this emergency 
over ninety-nine per cent, of the regimental 
strength answered at morning roU-call, and 
reported for whatever service might be forth- 
coming. The commissioned and enlisted 
strength, under the State organization, aggre- 
gated seven hundred and ninety-three. The 
morning reports handed to the adjutant, dur- 
ing the short rest before the regiment took up its 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



27 



march towards the wharvee, showedfifty officers 
and seven hundred and thirty-six enlisted men 
present, with only seven enlisted men absent 
— and of the latter, all were satisfactoi'ily 
accounted for by i-eason of sickness or absence 
fi-om the State. Much has been said dining 
the past few months of the unreliability of 
militia in grave national emergencies, and it 
unfortunately is too true that in many States 
the records of the late war have tended to 
give force to such charges, but let it be re- 
membered in Massachusetts, so long as there 
esists a First Regiment in its military estab- 
lishment, that when a sudden call came, to 
meet what was felt to be a very real danger, 
the absentees when assembly was sounded 
numbered less than nine-tenths of one per 
cent, of the strength borne upon the regi- 
mental roUs. 

Soon after ten o'clock, the regiment formed 
in line of masses. The regimental colors were 
brought from the colonel's quarters, and were 
received with three hearty cheers. Then the 
battahons stood at attention while Chaplain 
Horton earnestly addressed the men on the 
fiignifleance of the day's events. At the close 



28 The First Regiment 

of his remarks the regiment broke into col- 
umn of detachments, the heavy doors of the 
armory swung wide, and the First Massa- 
chusetts Heavy Artillery — literally the first 
militia regiment in the country to come to 
the assistance of the general Government — 
marched out for the war, with its band at the 
head of the column playing the time-honored 
'' March of The First-" 



OFF FOR ACTIVE SERVICE 



ly. 



TT was a raw, gloomy day. A drizzliud 
rain fell at intervale, and the pavementJ 
were slippery with mud. The batterieJ 
paraded in heavy marching order — kuapsackl 
haversack, canteen, and mess-kit — and worf 
great-coats and leggings. The line of maiclB 
was: Irvington Street, Huntington Avenuel 
Copley Square, Boylston Street, BerkeleJ 
Street, Beacon Sti'eet, School Street, Wash-I 
ington Street, State Street, Broad StreetB 
to Rowc's Wharf. In spite of the incleraenl 



32 The First Regiment 

granite steps of the Institute of Technology- 
were densely packed with students, who 
cheered lustily as the batteries, with not a few 
graduates and undergraduates of the school 
in their ranks, swung by before them. 

At the State House there came another 
ovation. On the same spot where Governor 
Andrew, on the 25th of May, 1864, had 
welcomed back the regiment on its return 
from three glorious years of service with the 
Army of the Potomac, stood Governor Wol- 
cott, with the oflBlcers of his staflF, to speed the 
Old First on its way to yet another war. 
There was little ceremony; there was no ora- 
tory — but the moment, none the less, was 
impressive. On the one hand, as the long 
column took its way over the hill, was the 
grand bronze memorial to Shaw and his 
heroic men, mutely eloquent of duty done and 
history made; on the other, as mutely elo- 
quent of duty yet to be performed and his- 
tory yet to be written, was the Governor of 
the Commonwealth, erect and motionless, 
standing uncovered under the lowering sky as 
his troops, with his own son a private in the 
ranks, tramped steadily past in parting review. 



Massachuselts Heavy Artillery. 



35 



On School Sti'eet, and again on State Street, 
the regiment was loyally welcomed. In spite 
of slippery and treacherous pavements, align- 
ments and distances were well maintained, 
and the batteries marched with the long, 
swinging step for Which the command always 
has been noted, though the unequal platoon- 
fronts due to the detachment formation of 
foot artillery gave an odd effect to the 
column. All through the business district 
the applause and cheering were continuous, 
and it was almost with a sense of relief that 
the regiment finally boarded its transport, the 
steamer General Lincoln, and escaped from 
the patriotic uproar- But even here a part- 
ing cheer was heard, for the men of the 
Naval Brigade, on board the Minnesota, came 
swarming from below in their white unifoi-ms, 
and strained their throats in fraternal desire 
to start the regiment fittingly on its way to 
the outer harbor-works. 

With the regimental staff paraded Colonel 
Richard H. Morgan, A.I.G. (formerly major 
commanding the Third Battalion), who had 
been detailed to accompany the command 
as inspecting officer, and Lieutenant Erasmus 



36 The First Regiment 

M. Weaver, Second United States Artilleiy 
(later lieutenant-colonel, Fifth Massachusetts 
Infantry, U.S.V., and now captain in the reg- 
ular artillery), who for the year previous had 
been attached to the regiment as instructor in 
coast artillery work, and to whose untiring 
efforts the regiment owed much for its effi- 
ciency. The field, staff, and line officers of 
the command on this date were as noted in the 
following roster — the sequence of battalions 
and batteries being that in which column was 
formed for parade: 

Colonel Charles Pfaff. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Charles B. Woodman. 

Staff, 

1st Lieut. Charles H. Lake, Adjutant ; 1st Lieut. 
John S. Keen an, Quartermaster; Major Howard S. 
Bearing, Surgeon; 1st Lieut. William A. Eolfe, 
Assistant Surgeon ; 1st Lieut. Horace B. Parker, 
Paymaster ; 1st Lieut. John B. Paine, Inspector Bifle 
Practice ; 1st Lieut. Horatio Hathaway, Jr., Signal 
Officer ; 1st Lieut. Joseph S. Francis, Eange Officer ; 
1st Lieut, George S. Stockwell, Aide-de-Camp ; Rev. 
Edward A. Horton, Chaplain. 



jDiKST BATTALION. 
Major Peblie A. Dyak. 

" G " Battery. (Station, Boston.) 

Capt. Albert B. Chick. 

First Lieut. Frank S. Wilson. 

Second Lieut. James H. Gowing. 

^^ H^^ Battery. (Station, Chelsea.) 

Capt. Walter L. Pratt. 
First Lieut. William Renfrew. 
Second Lieut. Bertie E. Grant. 

" A " Battery. (Station, Boston.) 

Capt. John Bordman, Jr. 

First Lieut. E. Dwight Fullerton. 

Second Lieut. Sumner Paine. 

" L " Battery. (Station, Boston.) 
Capt. Frederick M ^^' 



38 The First Regiment 

" C" Battery. Colors. (Statiofif Boston.) 

Capt. Chablbs p. Nuttbr. 

EiBST Lieut. Charles E. Nostbom. 

Second Lieut. Abthxtb E. Hall. 

" K" Battery. (Station, Boston.) 

Capt. Frederic S. Howes. 

First Lieut. P. Frank Packard. 

Second Lieut. Albert A. Gleason. 

" B " Battery. (Station, Cambridge.) 

Capt. Walter E. Lombabd. 

FiBST Lieut. John E. Day. 

Second Lieut. Mabshall Underwood. 

THIKD BATTALION. 
Major James A. Frye. 

" JIf " BaUery. (Station, Fall River.) 

Capt. Siebba L. Bbaley. 

FiBST Lieut. David Fulleb. 

Second Lieut. Fbedebick W. Habbison. 

"i^" Battery. (Station, Taunton.) 

Capt. Kobbis 0. Danfobth. 

FiBST Lieut. Febdinand H. Phillips. 

Second Lieut. William J. Meek. 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 

" E" Batter//. (Station, New Bedford.) 

Capt. Joseph L. Giebs. 

First Lieut. Habold C. Wiyo. 

Skcokd Lieut. (Vacancy.) 

" I" Battery. (^Station, Brockton) 

Capt. Chaelhs Willi ams on. 

First Lieut. Gkoroe E. Hortow. 

Skookd Lieut, Wellington H. Nilhson, 

!he Non-Cora missioned Staff and Headquartera' at- 
taches were the following : Sekgeakt-Majok William 

D. HuDDLKsoN j Quartermaster-Sergeant Edwakd 

E. Chapman; Hospital Steward George T. Sawyer; 
Patmastek-Sep.geant George R. Russell j Drum 
Major James F. Clark; Chief Bugler Fkederiok 
A. H. Bennett ; Colok-Serqbants Axel T. Tornkosb 
AND Horace N. Conn; Obdbrlt Samuel Weiss; 
Bandmaster Frank L. Collins. 

Almost exactly at nooutide, and white the 
cheers of the artillerjmen in response to those 
of their bi-ethreii of the INaval Brigade still 
were echoing across the water, the General 
Lincoln cast off her lines, and, amid ear-pierc- 
ing salutes from every vessel provided with 
steam enough to start a whistle-valve, ran 
down the channel between Forts Winthrop 
and Independence, on her coui-se for Fort 



40 The First Regiment 

"Warren. In passing out of the upper harbor, 
the transport ran close to the great British 
cable-steamer Minia^ whose crew swarmed at 
her rail and yelled their enthusiastic approval 
of the proceedings, while high on her bridge 
her officers lifted their caps in acknowledg- 
ment of the answering roar from the men in 
blue. And then, at a sharp order from the 
bridge, a petty officer ran aft on the Minia^ 
and the red ensign of England was thrice 
dipped by way of wishmg luck to the Yankee 
volunteers. It was a pleasant incident, as well 
as one not without significance, and the men 
of the regiment promptly appropriated it as a 
good omen. 

Once more the Old First Regiment of Mas- 
sachusetts was off for service. Thirty-seven 
years earlier, on May 27th, 1861, it had com- 
pleted its muster into the volunteer army of 
the United States, leaving Boston on June 
15th, and proceeding at once to Washington, 
where it had the high honor of being the first 
of the three-years' regiments to report, armed 
and equipped, for duty. Since that time the 
changes had been many; officers and men had 
come and gone ; batteries had been trans- 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 

ferredj disbanded, or reorganized, until therJ 
remained but six out of the twelve (" B," "D,'] 
" E," " G," " H," and " K") whose record J 
showed seiTJce in the previous war, while on 
these only three ("D," "G,"and"H") had 
campaigned with the old War First fi-om '61 tol 
'64. But through all the vicissitudes of overl 
a third of a century the traditions and spiriJ 
of the early days had been reverently cherishei 
and tept sacred, until now, when the latestl 
call had come, the young men whose pride iti 
was that they bore the veteran name and num-B 
ber were again first in ready response to theB 
summons. 

Sheltering themselves as best they conidi 



42 The First Regiment 

had assembled his battalion and battery com- 
manders to receive their final instructions look- 
ing towards the comfort of the men when the 
fort should be reached. 

The regiment had been hurriedly called out, 
and at an inclement season of the year, but its 
officers felt that it was fairly ready, so far as 
equipment went, for any service that might be 
expected in the immediate future. In the 
matter of small-arms there was little to be de- 
sired, since an issue of the latest model Spring- 
field rifle — fresh from the national armory, 
and in perfect condition — had been made 
during the winter previous. Uniforms and 
great-coats, if lacking in smartness, were at 
least serviceable. Many batteries owned their 
blankets, and in addition to these there was on 
hand a full supply for the regiment, both woolen 
and rubber, which only awaited issue. The 
medical department had well-filled chests, with 
the necessary equipment and furniture for a 
small field hospital. Each battery had started 
from its station with full travel rations for 
forty-eight hours, which would tide over the 
interval required to set in operation a con- 
solidated regimental mess. Several cases of 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 

heavy shoes had been ordered, to have at hauJ 
in case delay should be experienced in lillina 
requisitions for foot-gear. There were 
hand twelve thousand rounds of emall-arrJ 
ammunition — not enough to go far in an ink 
fantrj' fight, but sufficient for supplying thJ 
belts of sentries and patrol-boat crews at i 
coast fort. 

Considered as a whole, and more eapeciallj 
in contrast with the wretchedly found corn! 
mands sent into the field by most other Statesl 
the regiment certainly was in efficient and serf 
viceable condition; it had the material uecesi 
sary for talcing care of itself, and, better still, i 
officers and men were self-reliant and ca; 



44 The First Regiment 

parade at Fort Warren, in readiness for the 
coming of the regiment. In this expectation, 
however, the commanding officer was destined 
to meet disappointment. 



THE REGIMENT AT FORT WARREN 



V. 



^HORTLT after one o'clock, the transp^ 
drew alongside the pier at Fort Warre 
d the batteries disembarked and formed i 
'umn, with the field music at the head. The: 
regiment marched up from the pier, ii 
mgh the main sallyport, and on to the par 
where line of masses was formed, arm 
stacked and knapsacks unslung, prepara 
to the work of getting the baggage u; 
the transport and settling: ^^'' 
rs. And here f^^ ' 



48 The First Regiment 

was obvious to the most obtuse that the com- 
ing of night would find the task of village- 
building hardly begun — and this led the seven 
hundred men standing at ease behind the line 
of stacks on the soggy parade ground, and 
lunching in the cold, drizzling rain, on hard- 
tack and canned beef, to make philosophical 
comments on the horrors of war in general, and 
of this war in particular. 

But the time allowed for this innocent pas- 
time was brief. Battery by battery, details 
were told off for pack-train duty, and in a 
very short time an endless chain of men 
circulated between the pier and the parade, 
filing empty-handed through the little postern 
in the northwestern bastion, and returning by 
way of the main sallyport, heavy laden with 
roof and wall sections. Even the wearied 
men in brown from Deer Island — who 
promptly had been christened by the battery- 
men the ^^ Third Corps of Cadets '^ — seemed 
to catch the spirit of the occasion, and showed 
more animation in putting one foot before the 
other. And it was here that the regiment 
added to its repertoire a new version of an old 
song, with the merry refrain : 



k 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 

" They broke our backs 
A-luggin' shacks, 
In the regular army-0 ! " 



By night, thei-e had been enough houee- 
building accomplished for the sheltering of 
four batteries. The rest of the men etowed 
themselves in odd corners of the fort, large 
numbers bunking with their friends the regu- 
lars, and many picking out soft spots on the 
floor of the post recreation-room and gym- 
nasium. As a matter of fact, it was four days 
before the entire command was settled in 
quartei's — wet, windy days at that — lack 
of working tools for putting the houses 
together delaying the completion of the task. 
But when the village finally stood finished, it 
was a model village indeed — with a city hall, 
as exemplified by the office of the adjutant; a 
city hospital, in the shape of the surgeon's 
red cross shanty; eight straight, though nar- 
row, streets, with six houses in each; and last, 
if far fi'om least, a fii-e department, consisting 
of two hose-reels manned by detachments 
from "I" and " L " Batteries, with Captains 
"Williamson and Whiting serving as the Board 
of Engineers. Later there was added a 



62 The First Regiment 

banquet hall, in the shape of a huge mess-tent, 
which loomed up grandly in fair weather, but 
tumbled ignominiously into the mud on the 
stormy days when it was most needed; but in 
the early days, officers and men took their 
rations as best they could, in the stuflfy case- 
mate of the gymnasium or amid the gloom of 
the ^^ Dark Arch/' And it may be said here 
that the messing problem was not a matter 
for easy solution, since the crowded condition 
of the fort made it impossible for the batteries 
to cook with their Buzzacot outfits, while the 
fixed kitchen appliances used by the regulars 
were inadequate for rationing a garrison of 
over nine hundred men. The question was 
finally settled, however, by employing a con- 
tractor to provide a general mess for the regi- 
ment, and this method was followed in the 
rationing of the command until it was broken 
up and sent to its various coast stations, late 
in May. 

If the enlisted men were not luxuriously 
quartered in the early days at Fort Warren, 
the commissioned officers certainly were not 
much better off. The colonel, with his fom*- 
teen field and staff officers, went to house- 



Tiree rooms in the sec* 
emate to the eastward of the sallypJ 
lie the first casemate to the westwn 
nd its eight rooms well populated with tl 
■ty-five officers of the line. The rooj 
igned to the lieutenant-colonel, the thrt 
jore, and the surgeon was a type of garril 
luxury. It was lighted and aired bj^ 
Be narrow musketry loopholes, which af- 
^ed a eomewhat monotonous view of the 
I ditch and sodded slope of the northern 
|r-face, while its contracted area was 
up in part by five cots, as many field- 
^, and a variable number of camp-stools. 
t had an open grate, in which a coal fire 
Uways glowing, and on the nights when 
■n drove down upon the muddy parai 



54 The First Regiment 

the proper non-commissioned officers, quar- 
tered in each shack, an allowance which gave 
ample space. 

When the command reported at the fort, it 
was in excellent condition so far as concerned 
its health, and its officers purposed to keep it 
so. It is worth noting that on the day after 
its arrival, in spite of the fatigue, exposure, 
and excitement attendant upon its departure 
from home, there was not a single response at 
morning surgeon's call, which was nothing 
less than remarkable when it is recalled that 
here were over seven hundred and fifty men, 
fresh from office, shop, and factory, who had 
slept in damp uniforms, and in most uncom- 
fortable quarters. This good record in the 
matter of health was maintained to the end of 
the regiment's term of service, and that it was 
so maintained is due to more than mere 
chance. Rigid rules, rigidly enforced, were 
laid down for camp sanitary matters, and 
minute inspections were daily made by both 
battalion and battery commanders, while the 
medical officers were alert and untiring in 
looking to the welfare of the men. The try- 
ing and unseasonable ^ea>i]tieT oi \a\fc k^^rc^ 



THE REGIMENT AT FORT WARREN 



46 



A PERIOD OF SUSPENSE 



VI. 



^Y^/THLE the work of settling the regi- 
ment at its ]iew station was in prog- 
ress, its officers found themselves confronted 
by a new and serious cause for apprehension. 
Up to the time of arriving at the fort, there 
had been a marked lack of definite information 
as to the futm-e service of the command. 
Only two facts seemed assured : that the Pres- 
ident had called for one hundred and twenty- 
five thousand volunteers, and that the hurried 
ordering out of the First had been in partial 
answer to that call. Before the enthusiasm 
attending the prompt assembly of the regiment 
had died away, there came to Fort Warren a 
bit of news which Hterally dumbfounded its 
oflicers and men. Word was received fi'om 
the State House that General Corbin, in as- 
signing the quota of Massachusetts, had made 
requisition for fom" regiments of infantry, and 
but three batteries of heavy artillery ! 

The effect of this announcement may be 



60 The First Regiment 

better imagined than described. Here was a 
regiment which since 1882 had received des- 
ultory instruction in artillery work, and since 
1 892 had devoted itself seriously to the study 
of the duties of this arm ; year by year it had 
improved in discipline and gained in efficiency 
until its officers and men, beyond any doubt 
or question, were fully capable of serving intel- 
ligently and well the secondary armament — 
even if not the most modem ordnance — in 
any works on the coast ; it had annually, in 
its encampments, been brought into contact 
with regulars, and had become thoroughly 
familiar with the surroundings of permanent 
fortifications ; moreover, it was the only regi- 
ment of militia heavy artillery in the entire 
country — and yet a single telegram from 
Washington threatened to overthrow the work 
of long years, and to destroy by a stroke of 
the pen an organization to whose up-building 
patriotic men unselfishly had given their time, 
their money, and their most earnest efibrt. 

It hardly need be said that on the receipt of 
this intelligence the officers of the regiment, 
from the Chief to the last subaltern, passed 
through the successive stages of astonishment, 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



61 



humiliation, and bitter chagrin, to a final con- 
dition of supreme disgust. It seemed evident 
that the First Massachusetts, after its half- 
century of honorable service in peace and war, 
either had been forgotten, or else was destined 
to be entirely ignored. The action of the War 
Department seemed inexplicable under the 
circumstances. The country suddenly had 
become involved in a war in which attacks on 
its coast cities were possible, if not imminent ; 
while wofully lacking in trained troops of all 
arms, it stood most distressingly in need of 
garrison artilleiy; Massachusetts, alone among 
the States, was ready and waiting to offer a 
regiment of fairly disciplined and fairly trained 
artillerymen — and was called upon for but three 
batteiies! And this, it should be noted, in the 
face of an exigency which compelled the Com- 
manding Officer of the Department of the East 
(General Orders, No. 21, 6th June, 1898) to 
issue such instructions as these : " In case the 
regular artillery troops at any post are not suf- 
ficient properly to mau all the guns, the com- 
manding officer will apply for such officers, 
companies, or details frotn the infantry sup- 
ports, to be assigned to these duties, as may 



62 The First Regiment 



be necessary. At fortifications where no ar^ 
tille7y troops are stationed^ the post com- 
mander will select such companies or number 
of troops as shall be necessary, and assign 
them to that duty.'' It is a matter of record 
that such assignments had to be made, and 
that the raw troops used for the purpose not 
only were absolutely useless as artillerists, but 
even, in some instances, proved themselves in- 
capable of properly caring for the expensive 
artillery material placed under their control. 

The War Department should not have been 
in ignorance of the existence of this regiment, 
or of its condition of comparative efficiency. 
Yearly, from 1892 to 1897, reports upon its 
progress had been compiled by Colonel Miller, 
of the Third United States Artillery, and by 
Colonel Kline, of the Twenty-first United 
States Infantry — both of whom, to the satis- 
faction of those in the Massachusetts service, 
since have become general officers — and these 
reports had shown uniform commendation of 
the conscientious work that was being done. 
In 1896 Colonel Klme reported : '' With this 
year's work, Massachusetts has a corps (the 
First Eegiment) for coast-defence. Should 



Massachusetls Heavy Jrtiller\ 



65 



an emergency arise necessitating the immediate 
reenforcement of Fort Warren, the whole of 
this fine regiment could in twenty-four hours 
be sent to the post, and would now be of in- 
valuable service" And in his report for 1897, 
submitted at a time when war was almost in 
sight, he repeated with added emphasis his 
comment of the preceding year: "The Legisla- 
ture of the State of Massachusetts, recognizing 
the advisability of a coast-defence resei-ve, 
promptly legislated the transfer of one of the 
infantry regiments (First) for this duty. The 
wisdom of this legislation cannot be questioned. 
Under adverse conditions the regiment has 
labored ; without the means of receiving 
proper instruction, save such as could be given 
by officers when released fi'om their duties, 
given freely and unstintedly, yet they have 
succeeded in fitting the organization as a re- 
serve force that could now be of invaluable 
service." In both these extracts the italics 
are those found in the original report, as 
printed by the Military Infoi*mation Division 
at Washington. 

Api)arently the emergency requiring the 
immediate reenforcement of Fort Warren had 



66 The First Regiment 

arriyed; in less than twenty hours from the 
time orders reached the men, the regiment 
had reported at the post, armed, uniformed, 
rationed, and equipped; officers and men stood 
ready to render the invaluable services for 
which an inspecting officer of the Government 
had declared them fit — and yet now, at a 
time when hastily raised and untrained in- 
fantry was to be thrown headlong into artillery 
posts, there came word from Washington that 
the First Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, as an 
organization, would receive no consideration 
as a part of the volunteer army of the United 
States. 

It was small wonder that this verdict was 
received with something very like consterna- 
tion. If it could not be reversed, the destruc- 
tion of the regiment was certain. For years 
the men had been schooled in the belief that 
they were in fact, if not in name, essentiaUy a 
part of the army of the United States ; every 
enlistment had been made on the understand- 
ing that in time of peace faithful service was 
to be rendered to Massachusetts, in time of 
war, to the United States. The splendid esprit 
de corps of the cotamaudL \ia.^ \i^^xL ^.^x^lxJ^ 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



67 



bailt up upon this supposition, and the men 
had been taught to beheve that the hard train- 
ing to which they were subjected was in- 
tended to fit them for eomething more than 
mere parade and ceremony, for something be- 
yond possible riot duty — in short, for some- 
thing no less serious than the defence of their 
country in the hour of need. 

All this was at once made known to Grov- 
ernor Wolcott, who instantly appreciated the 
disastrous effect of the proposed action, and 
Bet himself to the task of finding a remedy. 
By his direction, Colonel Sohier, A.D.C., of 
hie staff, hurried on to Washington, where 
by personal effort he succeeded in securing a 
reversal of the decision first made by General 
Corbin, who not only accepted the regiment 
as then organized, but even further directed 
that its term of service should date from April 
26th — thus officially recognizing the com- 
mand as first in the field for the war. The 
regimental pay-rolls subsequently were made 
up from this date, and officers and men were 
paid accordingly. 

But though Colonel Sohier was sncceseful 
in his mission so far as concerned saving the 



68 The First Regiment 

regiment for the national service, it was found 
impossible to secure permission to recruit the 
command to war strength, for the absurd 
reason that to do so would exceed the quota 
of volunteers allotted to Massachusetts. From 
a purely technical point of view, this decision 
seems inexplicable. There was crying need, 
at the time, for garrison artillery, while it was 
not expected that any serious demands would 
be made upon the infantry of the army before 
autumn; why, then, the proportion was not 
maintained by recruiting the First, and accept- 
ing one of the regiments of Massachusetts 
infantry temporarily on its peace strength, 
must always remain beyond the comprehen- 
sion of those unfortunate enough to have had 
a professional knowledge of the coast-defence 
conditions prevailing at the opening of the late 
war. 



FROM "M.V.M." TO "U.S.V." 



72 The First Regiment 

lected the matter of making inquiries as to 
what had become of the old one. These in- 
structions were brief and to the point: 
^^ Colonel Charles Pfaff, having been designated 
to command a volunteer regiment of heavy 
artillery, under the call of the President of 
the United States, will cause the enrolment of 
such officers and men as may volmiteer in such 
regiment, and will cause to be prepared the 
necessary papers for muster into service of 
such volunteers, by Major Carle A. Woodruff, 
commanding at Fort Warren/' 

This order meant two things for the officers 
of the First. It required a final and most 
careful revision of the battery rolls, and a last 
searching scrutiny by the medical officers of 
the physical condition of the rank and ffle. 
Of these two requirements, the first was by 
far the most important. Had the regiment 
been formed in line, and the order been ^ven 
for volunteers to step to the front, there can 
be no question that the command would have 
responded to the last man. But it was 
exactly this sort of thing that the officers 
wished to avoid. The regiment was about 
to enter upon a two-^ea^^ Xferca. c^S. ^^\- 



^^ vn. 

n^HB re^ment was saved. Furthermore, it 
was actually, if not legally, m the service 
of the United States. But there yet remained 
certain complex processes which had to be gone 
through with before the " U.S.V." should sup- 
plant the " M.V.M." By a pleasant legal fic- 
tion, it had to be assumed that the militia regi- 
ment which had set out for Fort Warren had 
been lost somewhere en route, and that it had 
become imperatively necessary to raise a new 
regiment to take its place in the volunteer 
service. All this, of course, was but the most 
utter rubbish — and rubbish which under 
easily supposable conditions might prove dan- 
gerous — yet the obsolete militia laws which 
Congress has left upon the statute books, 
unaltered for nearly a centuiy, made its ob- 
servance necessary. General Dalton therefore 
(Special Orders, No. 45, 29th Apiil) gravely 
issued instructions for the formation of the 
new regiment, though oddly enough he neg- 



74 The First Regiment 

or physical deficiencies, they were obliged to 
pass upon the qualifications of nearly nine 
hundred officers and men. It should be re- 
corded, to the credit of the battery commanders 
as recruiting officers, that rejections for physi- 
cal causes were few and far between, the rigid 
examination finding but one officer and fifteen 
men — a surprisingly small number — unfit for 
duty. General sympathy was felt for those 
sent away by the surgeons, for without excep- 
tion they were men whose desire to go out 
with the regiment was of the keenest. 

But during all the uncertainty as to the final 
disposition of the regiment, as well as while 
the work of transferring it fi^om the militia to 
the volunteer service was in progress, the gar- 
rison duty for which it had been so hastily 
summoned was not neglected for a moment. On 
the 27th of April, the day after the command 
reported at the fort, the batteries had been 
assigned to their fighting-stations, and steady 
drill at the guns had begun. The drill was 
no light matter; excluding the ceremonies 
of guard-mounting and evening parade, the 
regimental order called for four hours and a 
half daily of solid work al l\v^\^^«:^ ^^xxsa^^^sA 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 75 

that work was performed with an energy never 
shown at the annual toui's of instruction in 
time of peace. On the many daye when 
weather conditions kept the men from the para- 
pets, schools of iustmction were held in quar- 
ters, for the study of guard duty, of army 
regulations, and other matters of the sort. By 
April 30th, the regimental signal corps, made 
up of twelve non-commissioned officers and 
thirty-six privates, under the signal officer with 
an assistant, had been fiilly organized, and 
was steadily employed in wig-wagging. On 
May 1st, the light regimental guard mounted 
during the first few days of the tour was re- 
placed by a strong guard of two officers with 
fifty-seven non-commissioned officers and pri- 
vates. From these, details were made for the 
patrol-boat crews, and reliefs were fm'nished 
for the chain of posts by which the island was 
surrounded. 

With the assignment to gun-stations, the 
organization of the garrison on a fighting- 
basis stood completed. The two regular bat- 
teries — " C " (Sehenek's) and " M " (Rich- 
mond's) — were stationed at the 10-inch, 
breech-loading, disappearing rifles mounted in 



76 The First Regiment 

Bastion B and in the Bavelin Battery; with 
them, for purposes of instruction, and to fur- 
nish reliefs if required, were four batteries of 
the volunteers, ^^ A '' (Bordman's), ^ C ^ (Nut- 
ter's), ^^ I'' (Williamson's), and ^^L'' (Whit- 
ing's). To the 8-inch converted rifles on 
the eastern face of the fort, commanding the 
main ship channel, were assigned four more 
batteries of the First, '' B '' (Lombard's), ^ F " 
(Danforth's), ^^K" (Howes'), and ^^M" 
(Braley's). The 15-inch Kodman guns, 
mounted in barbette on Bastion A, were manned 
by ^^G" (Chick's) and ^^H" (Pratt's) Bat- 
teries. ^^E " Battery (Gibbs') was told off for 
the 8-inch converted rifles in the casemate bat- 
tery of Bastion A, while '' D " Battery (Froth- 
ingham's) was assigned to the machine-gun 
section, made up of Hotchkiss and Gatling 
guns. 

Variety in artillery work certainly was not 
lacking, for the men of the regiment found 
themselves called upon to handle every type 
of ordnance, from the ponderous modern rifle, 
on its complex mount, to the spitefdl Gatling, 
destined to spit its fire at prowling torpedo- 
boats or chance lan^fing paT\svfe^. ^ot ^^^ \5cl^ 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



77 



drill in the manual of the piece all that was 
required: attention had to be given to maga- 
zine-work, mechanical manoeuvres, and the 
use of cordage, while range and position find- 
ing were not neglected. " K " and "L " 
Batteries also obtained a chance to demonstrate 
their knowledge of the use of garrison-gin 
and sling-cart by moving from the fort to the 
pier certain spare 8-inch converted rifles, for 
shipment to other points on the coast — a task 
which they perfonned promptly and with credit 
to their earher training in the handling of 
heavy weights. Infantry drill was not entirely 
neglected, and daily marching mancenvi'ea and 
setting-up exercises were relied upon to keep 
the men in form, while steadiness under arms 
was taught at each evening parade. 

Meanwhile progress in the preparations for 
the muster of the regiment into the service 
of the United States had not been delayed. 
Colonel H. E. Converse, A.Q.M.G., assisted 
by Colonel P. B. Stevens, A.D.C., had been on 
duty at the post, representing the State in the 
final settlement of property accountability on 
the part of the battei-y commanders, and as the 
result of their labors the title to the anna and 



78 The First Regiment 

equipments of the regiment was passed to the 
general Government. The physical examina* 
tions had been concluded, and recruits had 
been received for all vacancies. Muster-rolls 
and all other papers were ready on Saturday, 
May 7th, and on the evening of that day 
Colonel Pfaff reported his command as pre- 
pared for the mustering-in ceremony. It was 
first proposed to have this take place on Sun- 
day, but on second thought it was considered 
better to defer it until the following day — 
which, as it proved, resulted in giving to ^^ K " 
Company, of the Second Massachusetts Infan- 
try, the honor of being the first command in 
the State to complete its actual muster. 

Contrary to the prevailing rule, Monday, the 
9th of May, proved to be a sunny and pleasant 
day. Early in the morning, the regiment was 
formed in its battery streets, in readiness for 
its entry into the volunteer army. Promptly at 
eight o'clock. Major Carle A. Woodruff, Second 
United States Artillery, commanding the post, 
and with it the other defenses of Boston 
Harbor, took his station before regimental 
headquarters, in readiness for the ceremony. 
The regiment felt itBeVf Yiotvoy^SlVj \xv^ ^^\aSL 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



81 



as ita mustering-officer: a typical American 
soldier, he had received the brevets of captain, 
major, and lieutenant-colonel for gallant and 
meritorious services at Gettysburg, at Trevil- 
lian Station, and during the Civil War as a 
whole, while he also had been decorated with 
the medal of honor for distinguished gallantry 
in action at Newby's Cross Roads. He had 
been closely identified with the regiment since 
its change from the infantry to the artillery 
arm, and its officers held him in the warmest 
esteem. 

It had been arranged that the batteries should 
be mustered in the order of the seniority of 
their captains, and thus the first command to 
march across the parade was "M," under 
veteran Captain Braley, who was responding 
for the second time to the call of his country 
in time of war. His appearance before the 
musteruig officer was the signal for a round 
of applause from the group of staff officers 
gathered at headquarters. In a very few 
minutes both he and his command had ceased to 
be militiamen, and had become United States 
Vohmteers — to be followed rapidVy \i^ ^ft 
other eleven batteries of the regiment. Xs 'k- 



82 The First Regiment 

matter of record, it was exactly 9.34 A.M. when 
Colonel Woodruff finished admmistering the 
oath to the field, staff, and non-conunissioned 
staff oflScers, thus completing the muster of the 
regiment. Everything had moved with the 
regularity of clock-work, and in hut little over 
an hour and a half more than seven hundred 
and fifty oflScers and men had answered to their 
names as called from the muster-rolls, and had 
sworn to serve the United States faithfully and 
well for the two years to come. 

In this connection the statement made in the 
newspaper history of the Second Massachu- 
setts Infantry must be corrected. It is but a 
minor point, of com*se, yet soldiers are wont 
to be jealously tenacious on minor points 
affecting their own records. ^^ This regiment,'' 
writes the historian of the Second, ^^ was the 
first to be mustered into the service of the 
United States, the first to leave Massachusetts, 
the first to invade Cuba — the first of our 
regiments to enter the actualities of war." As 
a strict matter of record, the Second Infantry 
was mobilized at Framingham on May 3rd, 
where it completed its muster-in (though ^^ K " 
Company had been mu^t^t^Qi oii ^^^ "^Jfic^j otl 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



831 



May 10th. The First Artillery entered the I 
United States service as militia on April 26th, 
dating its pay-rolls from that day, and had been 
mastered complete before 10 o'clock in the I 
forenoon of May 9th. It was the first militia I 
regiment in the service; it became the first I 
volunteer regiment in the service. In con- 
tending for this recognition it certainly does I 
not seek to rob the Second of its hard-won I 
laurels, for the First and Second, brigaded I 
together for long years, always have been I 
firm friends, though strong rivals. Chained I 
in its posts along shore, the First yet watched I 
with interest and admiration the career of t 
men from western Massaehnsetts, and in t 



vni. 



/"^"N the completion of the mustering-iii there 
came an incident which was charaeteristid 
of the spirit of the First. Since all of thel 
volunteer commissions due the regiment woidd^ 
bear the same date, it was evident that a dc-| 
cision must be made to settle question,s 
seniority. Army regulations prescribe thati 
lots shall be drawn in eases similar to this,! 
and, had this legalized lottery been lield, therel 
was a tempting chance that the officer of lessB 
than a year's commissioned service might t 
himself out-ranking- another who had serv 



/ 



u 



vin. 

/^N the completion of the mustering-in there 
came an incident which was characteristic 
of the spirit of the First. Since all of the 
volunteer commissions due the regiment would 
bear the same date, it was evident that a de- 
cision must be made to settle questions of 
seniority. Army regulations presciibe that 
lots shall be drawn in cases similar to this, 
and, had this legalized lottery been held, there 
was a tempting chance that the officer of less 
than a year's commissioned service might find 
himself out-ranking another who had served 
faithfully in the militia for years in a like 
grade. To the everlasting credit of the regi- 
ment, its officers declined to avail themselves 
of this opportunity for unearned advancement, 
and by their wish the first general order issued 
from headquarters of the newly-made volun- 
teer regiment published a roster of the com- 
mand, determining the rank and precedence 
in the several grades, as established by previ- 
OUB service in the militia of Massachusetts, 



88 



The First Regiment 



As mustered into the volunteer service, the 
regiment was oflScered as follows : 

1. Col. Charles PfafE. 

2. Lt.-Col. Charles B. Woodman. 

3. Maj. Perlie A. Dyar. 

4. Maj. Greorge !F. Quinby. 

5. Maj. Howard S. Bearing 

6. Maj. James A. Frye. 

7. Capt. Sierra L. Braley . 

8. Capt. Joseph H. Frothingham 

9. Capt. Charles Williamson 

10. Capt. Norris 0. Danforth 

11. Capt. Albert B. Chick . 

12. Capt. Frederick M. Whiting 

13. Capt. Walter E. Lombard 

14. Capt. Charles P. Nutter . 

15. Capt. Walter L. Pratt . 

16. Capt. John Bordman, Jr. 

17. Capt. Frederic S. Howes 

18. Capt. Joseph L. Gibbs . 

19. 1st Lt. Horace B. Parker 

20. 1st Lt. Charles F. Nostrom 

21. 1st Lt. John S. Keenan . 

22. 1st Lt. John E. Day , . . 

23. 1st Lt. David Fuller . . 

24. 1st Lt Ferdinand H. Phillips 

25. 1st Lt. John B. Paine 

26. 1st Lt. William L. Swan 

27. 1st Lt. William Kenf rew 
28. 1st lit Frank 8. "WilsoTi . 



Surgeon. 

"M'' Battery. 
" D '' Battery. 
" I " Battery. 
"F" Battery. 
" G " Battery. 
«L^^ Battery. 
" B '' Battery. 
« C '' Battery. 
« H '' Battery. 
"A" Battery. 
"K^^ Battery. 
" E '' Battery. 
Adjutant. 
" C " Battery. 
Quartermaster. 
"B" Battery. 
"M'^ Battery. 
"F" Battery. 
Range OfiB.Ger. 
" L ^^ Battery. 
« H '^ Battery. 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



1st Lt. E. Dwight FiiUerton . 
lat Lt. P. Frank Packard . . 
1st Lt. WiUiam A. Rolfe . . 
1st Lt Norman P. Cormack . 
Ist Lt. Harold C. Wing . . . 
lat Lt. George E. Horton , . 
Ist Lt. George S. Stockwell . 
1st Lt. William S. Bryant . . 
2d Lt. Marshall Underwood . 
2d Lt. Frederick A. Cheney . 
2d Lt. Bertie E. Grant . . . 
2d Lt. James H. Gowing . . 
2d Lt. Albert A. Gleason . . 
2d Lt, Frederick W. Harrison . 
2d Lt. Wellington H. Nilsaon . 
2d Lt. William J. McCullough . 
2d Lt. Sumner Paine .... 
2d Lt. Joseph S. Francis . . 
2d Lt. Jamaa E. Totten . . . 
2d Lt Charles H. Fuller . . 



" A " Battery. 
"K" Battery. 
Assistant Surgeon. 
"D" Battery. 
" E " Battery. 
" I " Battery. 
Signal Officer. 
Assistant Surgeon. 
" B " Battery. 
"L" Battery. 
"H" Battery. 



" K " Battery. 
"M" Battery, 
" I " Battery. 
" D " Battery. 
" A " Battery. 
"C 



E " Battery. 



The non-commiesioned staff, as finally must- 
ered in, was made up of Sergt.-Maj. William 
D. Huddleson, Q.M.-Sergt. Edward E. Chap- 
man, Hospital Stewards Greorge T. Sawyer, 
Ira B. Phillips, Thomas "White, Principal 
Musicians James F. Clark and Frederick A. 
H. Bennett. Of the old non-commissioned 
staff, Paymaster-Sergt. GJeorge E. Russell and 



90 The First Regiment 



Color-Sergt. Axel T. Tomrose, whose militia 
grades were not recognized in the volunteer 
service, refused to be left behind, and proved 
their devotion to the regiment by enlisting as 
privates. The regimental band, .as well as 
the corps of field musicians attached to head- 
quarters under the militia organization, could 
not be mustered, and until the close of its 
term of service the regiment was obliged to 
rest satisfied with the music of its battery 
buglers, save for the short period at Framing- 
ham prior to going on furlough, when the 
thoughtfiilness of the State authorities allowed 
the band to rejoin. 

Under the terms on which the mustering of 
the regiment had been ordered by the War 
Department, it entered the service with forty- 
eight commissioned officers and seven hundred 
and three enlisted men, an aggregate for duty 
of seven hundred and fifty-one. In its per- 
sonnel the command was exceptionally fortu- 
nate. Of its officers, twenty-five per cent, 
were college bred, while in its ranks were to 
be found representatives of nearly every 
college and technical school in New England. 
In machinists, electriciau'a,aTii5L^E^^ftL\si^d5i5&^^ 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, 



93 



ice — the sort of material without which an 
artillery command never can attain its full 
efficiency — the regiment wae encouragingly 
strong. A newspaper sketch of the Sixth 
Maseachusetts Infantry, recently published, 
gives a roll of twenty-one Harvard men who 
served in that command, and accompanies it 
with this comment: " Harvard University con- 
tributed her quota to the army last summer, 
and the Sixth had as many of her sons in the 
rants as any regiment in the service." It is 
perhaps worth noting, though it hardly need 
be a matter for controversy, that no less than 
thirty-fom- gi-aduates and undergraduates of 
the Cambridge University went out with the 
First, of whom nine were commissioned offi- 
cers, while the i-emainder served faithfully 
and with credit as enheted men. It is a 
matter for regret that statistics relating to 
men from other colleges who served in the 
regiment are not available, but it may be of 
interest to record here the Harvard roll, which 
may be considered approximately complete : 

Commissioned officers: James A. Frye 
(1886), major; John Bordman, Jr. (1894), 
; John B. Paine (1891), first lieuten- 



iaptain 



94 The First Regiment 

ant and range officer; E. Dwight Fullerton 
(1898), first lieutenant; William A. Rolfe 
(M.S., 1890), first lieutenant and assistant 
surgeon; William S. Bryant (1884), first 
lieutenant and assistant surgeon, later pro- 
moted major and brigade surgeon, and assigned 
to Seventh Corps; Albert A. Gleason (1886), 
second lieutenant; Sumner Paine (1890), 
second lieutenant; Joseph S. Francis (1897), 
second lieutenant. 

Enlisted men: Louis H. Brittin (L.S.S., 
1901), corporal, «A"; Arthur H. Howard 
(1898), corporal, «A"; Edward D. Powers 
(1898), corporal, «A"; Kalph W. Black 
(1886), private, «K''; Edward A. Bumpus 
(1898), private, "A," later appointed second 
lieutenant. Twenty-first United States In- 
fantry; John Corbett (temporary student), 
private, «B"; Charles W. Cutler (1898), 
private, ''A''; Eugene H. Douglass (1898), 
private, ^^ A"; Howard B. Grose (1901), pri- 
vate, «K"; Frederick Heilig (1897), private, 
«A"; Edwin B. Holt (1896), private, « A"; 
Benjamin Kaufman (1900), private, '^D''; 
Charles II. Keene (1898), private, ^A''; 
JameB L. Knox (189S), i^xWaXfe, ^" K^' % ^^\«^ 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



95 



F. McGrath (1895), private, "A"; Moses I. 
Reuben (1889), private, "K"; George R. I 
Russell (temporai-y student), private, "K"; 
Francis R. Stoddard, Jr. (1899), private, 
"A"; Harry 0. Strong (1899), private, I 
"K"; Edward A. Thurston (temporary stu- 
dent, L.S.), private, "M"; Calvin S. Tilden 
(1898), private, "A"; Jolin A. White I 
(1896), private, "B"; Charles H. Wdliams 
(L.S.S., 1900), private, "A"; Francis C. 
Wilson (1898), private, "A"; Roger Wol- 
cott, Jr. (1898), private, "A." 



THE SEASON OF RUMORS 



100 The First Regiment 

city! Spook fleets were common in those 
days, and the men of the First, happily for- 
getfiil of the fact that they were manning 
obsolete works, armed for the most part with 
obsolete ordnance, and, worst of all, woftdly 
short of ammunition, daily hoped that the 
spook cruisers might materialize into ships 
of steel. What Uttle time was left from their 
duties they employed in pitying their less for- 
tunate comrades in inland camps, whom they 
considered hopelessly out of the game of 
coastwise attack and defence which was ex- 
pected to begin at any time. 

And all this speculation, as a matter of 
fact, was not so wild as it now may seem. 
It was known that the Spanish torpedo 
flotilla had rendezvoused at the Cape Verde 
Islands on March 24:th, where it was joined 
on April 14th by the Infanta Maria Teresa 
and Cristobal Colon^ and later, on the 20th, 
by the Vizcaya and Almirante Oquendo. On 
the 22d of April this formidable squadron 
was ordered to sea, and on the 29th it sailed 
— to a destination then unknown to any one 
on this side of the Atlantic. During the four 
anxious weeks that foWoN^eSi, >iXv\a >2cix^^\fc\sss\% 



IX. 



T^HESE were stirring times for the regi- 
ment. It was the period of rumors — of 
rumors that at auy time might develop into 
realities. In order to obtain an adequate idea 
of the atmosphere in which the command then 
lived, it would be necessary to turn to the files 
of the uewepaperB for the early spring of 
1898, and make a classified list of the Spanish 
naval bugaboos daily appearing in their 
columns, One odd coincidence is well worth 
recalling, as showing that all the misappre- 
hensions were not confined to om' own cities. 
On the evening of April 26th, the day on 
which the regiment reported at Fort "Warren, 
mass meetings were held at Portsmouth and 
New Bedford, to protest against the utter 
disregard shown by the Government for the 
defenses at those points — and on that very 
night there was given in Havana a public 
banquet to celebrate the bombardment of 
Boston, of which rumors had spread in that 



102 The First Regiment 

scents upon our open ports, rather than in 
fights with our own cruisers. 

As a matter of fact, during the months of 
May and June, the people dwelling along the 
coast were much in the condition of the small 
boy who is troubled by ^^seein' things at 
night," and apparently the masters of incom- 
ing vessels were laboring under a like afflic- 
tion. A very careful record of the Spanish 
apparitions by which the coast was haunted 
at this time was kept by an officer of the First, 
and to read it at this late day is to become 
convinced that the newspaper buyers of 1898 
most certainly got their money's worth. It 
is a weird catalogue of rumors, from the tale 
of the mysterious cannonading heard at East- 
port to the reported sighting of the ^Hhree 
long, low, rakish craft, sailing in column for- 
mation, and signalling by masthead lights 
as they steadily held their course in the dark- 
ness"— which might have fitted a Spanish 
squadron, but yet was equally applicable to 
the case of a tow of coal-barges on its way 
around the Cape to Boston. 

But in spite of the utter absurdity of many 
of the reports, the offiicer^ oi \3ii^ 'S^x^V ^w^ 



Massachusetts Heavy jirtillery. 



105 



much cai'eful couBideratioii to the diagrams in 
Brassey's "Naval Annual," and Janes' " Fight- 
ing Ships," with a view to putting 8-ineh shot 
in the spots where they would do the most 
good should occasion arise; and nobody was un- 
duly surprised when, shortly after midnight of 
May 13th, the Tourist, the steamer employed 
by the Engineers in their barbor-mining work, 
came puffing down from the city, announcing 
her arrival at the fort by long blasts of her 
whistle, and bringing word that at last the 
long-expected fleet had been sighted off Nan- 
tucket, steering a course for Boston. Coming 
by way of the Navy Department, this bit of 
intelligence seemed worthy of consideration, 
and so in the early morning the officers of the 
regular garrison sent their families away from 
the island and out of danger, while the volun- 
teers uncased the last of the small store of 8-inch 
projectiles for the guns in their charge, gave 
a final look to their equipments, and then sat 
themselves down on the parapets to await the 
first glimpse of Cervera's armada. Field- 
glasses were at a premium that day, and the 
wide expanse of water towards Boston light- 
ship became an object of much interest; but 



106 The First Regiment 

Cervera failed to appear, and to the disgust 
of regulars and volunteers alike it became 
evident, as the hours slipped away, that even 
official warnings ma the Navy Yard must be 
received with proper and due allowances. 

For some time now the port had been closed 
at night. Electric signal lanterns had been 
rigged upon the flagstaff of the fort, and every 
evening the officer of the guard was given the 
code signal for that especial date, by which 
ships of our navy were to be recognized. The 
orders of the post directed that any steamer 
failing to acknowledge signals from the fort, 
or replying by wrong combinations, should be 
fired on. But no steamers, either of the navy 
or of the merchant marine, attempted to make 
port after dark, and the only firing required 
was that done by patrol-boat crews, who were 
obliged at times to use their rifles on the fish- 
ermen and coasters which, under cover of 
darkness, ignorantly or wilfully persisted in 
blundering in among the nune-fielde. 

On the 3rd of May all troops of the At- 
lantic States had been placed under command 
of General Merritt, to be employed in coast- 
defence, and to him Co\oii^\YfeSx<6^w\fcSy.\ssa. 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



107 



regiment. Soon after, Lieutenant Stiother, 
(later major, U.S.V.), A.D.C. to General 
Merritt, was ordered to Boston for the pm"- 
pose of inspecting the regiment, so far as 
concerned its equipment for service, and rec- 
ommending stations for its assignment in the 
general scheme of defence. Having visited 
Fort Warren, where he made a careftil inquiry 
into the condition of the command, Lieutenant 
Strotber held a consultation with the State 
authorities, and returned to New York to 
report to his chief. On the 10th came tele- 
gi-aphic orders from Headquarters, Department 
of the East, detaching the Third Battalion 
("E," "F," "I," and "M" Batteries, under 
Major Frye), to report to Colonel Woodruff 
for duty as part of the garrison at Fort War- 
ren, and directing the remainder of the regi- 
ment to hold itself in readiness for assignment 
under orders later to be issued. 

Changes which ultimately concerned the 
First had meanwhile been in progress among 
the regular batteries stationed on the Kew Eng- 
land coast. "K" Battery (Curtis'), of the 
Second Artillery, had been ordered on Apiil 
28th from Fort Schuyler, IS.Y., to the ungar- 



108 The First Regiment 

risoned defenses at Portsmouth, N.H. On 
May 6th Colonel Woodruff, in addition to his 
duties as commanding officer at Fort Warren, 
was assigned to the general command of the 
defenses of Boston Harbor; Major Charles 
Morris, Seventh Artillery, was placed in com- 
mand of the Mortar Battery at Winthrop (up 
to this time in charge of Lieutenant Ketcham, 
Second Artillery, with a small detachment of 
about thirty men taken from the batteries at 
Warren) with a garrison made up of ^ M " 
Battery (Richmond's), Second Artillery, and 
^^F" Battery (Anderson's), Seventh Artillery, 
from Schuyler ; the gap left in the garrison at 
Warren by the withdrawal of Bichmond was 
filled by the transfer of ^^ G " Battery 
(Brown's), Seventh Artillery, from Schuyler; 
and finally. Lieutenant Lyon, with a detach- 
ment of thirty men from the batteries of the 
Second Artillery at Fort Adams, Newport, 
R.L, was ordered to the fort at Clark's Point, 
New Bedford, later to be named Fort Rodman. 
The shifting of regular batteries at Warren 
occurred on May 16th, and the officers of the 
First parted with regret from Captain Rich- 
mond, who had made raaivj trvfiviSA ^\£vsyck^^^\si* 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



109 



Most unexpectedly, on May 18th, a message 
was received at the fort announciug the coming 
of Governor Wolcott, to present to the officers 
their volunteer commissions. On his arrival 
the regunent formed for review, and afte]- the 
march-past stood closed in mass by battalions, 
with the officers grouped at the centre, while 
the Governor spoke a few words of farewell, 
saying, among other things: 

" It is yoiu- high privilege to have been sum- 
moned into the service of the United States 
at a time when the clouds of war with a for- 
eign Power threatened the Republic. I know 
of no higher service that a citizen can be called 
upon to render than to offer his life, if need be, 
in the cause of his counti-y. You enter tiiis 
service not as raw recruits, but with obedience 
and discipline acquired in the militia service 
of the Commonwealth. Whether you are 
assigned the honorable duty of guarding the 
sea-coast of the Commonwealth of your birth, 
or are summoned to some distant point in 
other lands or within the confines of your own 
country, see to it that no act of yours shall 
bring anght but added glory to the colors 
you bear. Be of high courage and 



good 



110 The First Regiment 

cheer; the great heart of the Commonwealth 
will follow you with pride and affection, what- 
ever the duty you may be called upon to per- 
form.'' 

Receiving the commissions from the hands 
of Colonel Bradley of his staff, who had served 
through the Civil War in the First Massachu- 
setts Heavy Artillery of 1861, the Governor 
then presented them to the officers of the reg- 
iment in the order of their rank, finally turn- 
ing to Colonel Pfaff to say, ^^ I congratulate 
you. Colonel, upon the regiment you have the 
honor to command, and upon the service you 
now enter." 

On the conclusion of this very simple yet 
impressive ceremony, the regiment was dis- 
missed. The Governor then made an informal 
inspection of battery quarters, and afterwards 
was conducted over the works in order that 
he might see for himself whatever of progress 
was being made towards installing modern 
armament in the main fortification of his capi- 
tal city. Later, with the members of his staff, 
he was the guest of the oflEicers' mess at lun- 
cheon ; and early in the afternoon he took 
£.nal leave of the regmieiAi, ^\i\0£i ?iX^^^ Wd 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. Ill I 

considered it an honor to serve under him ae I 
commander-in-chief, but now — though not I 
without a touch of regret — had passed for a [ 
time beyond his authority. 



ASSIGNMENT TO STATIONS 



X. 



T^HE day now had come when, after the 
custom of the artillery service, the regi- 
ment must be broken up and scattered in its 
isolated posts along shore. General Mcri'itt 
was relieved of the command of the Depart- 
ment of the East on May 20th, to go to the far 
East as commanding officer of the Phllippijie 
expedition. His successor was General Frank, 
U.S. v., promoted from the colonelcy of the 
First United States Ailillery, who lost no time 




116 The First Regiment 

placed. The Lieutenant-Colonel, and two bat- 
teries, to Clark's Point, Mass. Major Prye, 
with ^E,' ^F,' ^V and ^M' Batteries, will 
remain on duty at Fort Warren, as heretofore 
designated by telegraphic orders. The four 
remaining batteries, one each to Gloucester, 
Marblehead, iN'ahant, and Plum Island, Mass. 
Colonel Pfaff will designate the unassigned 
field officers and batteries for stations to the 
points other than Fort Warren, as he shall 
deem advisable, notifying these headquarters 
of the letters of batteries, and the officers 
so assigned, to the respective stations. The 
troops will take tents, camp equipage, and ten 
days' rations.'' 

This order ended for the time being all 
speculation as to the destination of the regi- 
ment in the immediate fiiture, and though it 
certainly failed to please everybody, it yet was 
received with little comment by those whom it 
concerned. It was recognized that artillery 
posts must vary from good to indifferent, or 
even from indifferent to bad, and the officers 
spent their leisure moments in pleasant con- 
jectures as to undesirability of the assignments 
whic\i were destined to isSi to ^tJi^evt \oV* 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



117 



On May 30th Colonel Pfaff issued the orders 
for the disti'ibution of the First and Second 
Battalions. " G " (Chick's) and " L " (Whit- 
ing's) Batteries, with Lieutenant Paine, range 
officer, and Lieutenant Bryant, assistant sur- 
geon, were ordered to report to Lieutenant- 
Colonel Woodman, to take station at New 
Bedford. For the garrison at Salem, " C " 
(Nutter's) and "D" (Frothingham's) Bat- 
teries were designated, under Major Dyar as 
commanding officer of the post, to whom 
was to report Lieutenant Eolfe, assistant 
surgeon, so soon as relieved fi-om his de- 
tail as post surgeon at Fort Warren. Major 
Quinby, with " K " (Howes') Battery, and Hos- 
pital Steward White, was assigned to the de- 
fenses at Gloucester. Captain Lombard, with 
"B" Battery, and Hospital Steward Phillips, 
was ordered to Newburyport, to establish a 
post at the entrance of the harbor. Captain 
Pratt, with " H " Battery, was assigned to the 
works at Marblehead. Captain Bordman, with 
"A" Battery, was directed to take station at 
Nahant, for the protection of the mining case- 
mate at that point. 

Prepai'atiou for these movements began 



118 The First Regiment 

promptly, but stormy weather and delay in 
seenring transportation made it over a week 
before the last of the departing batteries was 
able to leave Fort Warren. Meanwhile the 
posts for which these detachments from the 
regiment were destined had been garrisoned 
temporarily by the mihtia — commanded at 
first by General Mathews, and later by General 
Bancroft. Influenced by the prevailing uneasi- 
ness, Governor Wolcott, on May 7th, had pru- 
dently ordered his remaining State troops into 
the field for the protection of the coast until 
such time as the general Government should 
assume the responsibility, and the Fifth Infan- 
try, the First and Second Battalions of Cadets, 
with the three light batteries, had been render- 
ing valuable service at exposed points, from 
Hull to the mouth of the Merrimac. Unable to 
enter the volunteer service, under the limits 
imposed by the call of the President, these 
commands eagerly had responded to the call 
of the Commonwealth, and they most certainly 
are entitled to recognition for the faithful work 
performed, under most trying conditions as to 
weather, during the thirty days of their tour. 
On June 1st, IjieuteiiaTi\i-Go\o\i^^ ^c^^^saasj^ 



t 





Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



121 



and hie command left for New Bedford, pro- 
ceeding from Boston by rail; while, on the 
3rd, Colonel Pfaff" and the officers of his 
staff established regimental headquarters at 
Salem. On the 6th, Major Qiiinby and 
"A," "C," "D," and "H" Batteries left for 
their stations, followed on the 7th by " B " 
and "K" Batteries. All these latter com- 
mands were furnished with transportation by 
water, and it may be noted that the small 
steamers employed for the purpose were well 
loaded down by the troops and their baggage. 
It so happened that the departuB'e of the 
detachments took place during a period of 
very heavy weather, and more than one 
anxious watcher stood on the parajaet at 
Warren, to follow through field-glasses the 
course of the receding transports, as they 
rolled and pitched across the bay and towards 
the Noith Shore. 

The widely scattered detachments of the 
First now settled themselves as best they might 
at their respective coast-guard stations, and 
prepared to make the most of the scanty 
materials for defence which they found at 
hand. Under the final assignments, the dis- 



122 



The First Regiment 



Offlcen. 


Men. TottL 


3 


69 62 


4 


69 63 


3 


68 61 


13 


121 134 


3 


68 61 


13 


232 246 


9 


116 125 


48 


703 761 



tribution of the regimental strength was as 
follows : 

Station. 
Defenses of Newburyport . 
Stage Fort, Gloucester 
Fort Sewall, Marblehead . 
Fort Pickering, Salem 
Mining Casemate, Kahant 
Fort Warren, Boston 
Fort Rodman, New Bedford 

Aggregate for duty 

Hafdly had the regiment begun to adapt 
itself to the new conditions, when telegraphic 
orders from the War Department arrived 
directing that the batteries be at once recruited 
to full artillery strength, two hundred enlisted 
men each — or an aggregate of sixty officers 
and twenty-four hundred men for the entire 
command, since an additional second lieuten- 
ant would be appointed to each battery when 
on a war footing. It is needless to say that 
this order was hailed with delight by both 
officers and men : to the former it gave promise 
of more active service, while to the latter it 
meant unlimited promotion, since over two 
izizndred and fifty aQLQ^t\oTL'a\. ^^x^^SiOTi^^ ^sA. 



Massachusetts Heavy jirtiUery. 



123 



corporals would be required in the expanded 
batteries. No time was lost in preparing to 
comply with this order. Major Dyar was de- 
tailed as chief recruiting officer, with Captains 
WilUamson and Nutter as assistants, and plans 
were made for opening recniiting offices in 
Boston, New Bedford, Brockton, and Salem. 
Battery commanders immediately attempted to 
get into commnnication with the men whom 
they had left behind, under former conditions, 
in the hope of finding that not all of them had 
yet enlisted in the regulars or in other volun- 
teer regiments. Everything was ready for 
beginning the work of recruiting — when word 
came by telegraph from Washington that the 
whole matter was a mistake, and that the 
recruiting order had been meant to apply alone 
to the Massachusetts infantry regiments. It 
was a bitter disappointment. The regiment 
stood sadly inneed of recruits, since its strength 
as organized barely sufficed for the perform- 
ance of routine garrison duty, and when the 
President, on May 25th, issued his call for 
seventy-five thousand additional volunteers, 
the officers of the First felt that fromtKe aWo^j- 
ment of -Massachusetts they shou\A bX, \e;ft?.V 



124 The First Regiment 



secure enough men to bring the regimental 
enrolment up to twelve hundred. But for a 
second time they were destined to see their 
command passed by without consideration. 
The pressure exerted to bring the Fifth In- 
fantry into the volunteer service, or it may 
be some other cause yet remaining to be 
explained, left the faithful First still serving 
with skeleton ranks. 

In spite of all disappointments, however, 
the command never slackened in the perform- 
ance of its appointed work. There were many 
problems to be solved, and of these the most 
perplexing was how to evolve an efficient 
defence from ridiculously inadequate materials. 
In his command on the North Shore Colonel 
Pfaff found himself confronted by a grave 
situation of affairs. To him had been entrusted 
the defence of five important points, among 
them four towns aggregating over eighty-five 
thousand inhabitants, and with property inter- 
ests to be reckoned by tens of millions ; and, 
to state unpleasant facts with relentless exact- 
ness, every modern and effective appliance for 
defensive operations had been denied him. 
JVewburyport, Gloueee^fex, l&ax\^^<i^$^ «si^ 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 125 

Salem were all liable to bombardment from 
tbe open sea, and the fire of heavy guns alono 
could give even a promise of immunity from 
that fona of attack; but there were no heavy 
guns mounted at any of these points. Eight 
3-incli, muzzle-loading rifles (type of 18(52) 
had been brought to the coast by two of the 
militia light batteries, and these had been 
turned over to the volunteers relieving them, 
while sixteen Driggs-Sehroeder rapid-tire 
guns, ranging in calibre from one- to six- 
pounders, hastily purchased by the State from 
its war emergency appropriation, also had 
been placed in the hands of the batteries of 
the First. Beyond these there was nothing in 
the way of ordnnncc — not a gun, not a i-ound 




126 The First Regiment 

to meet sudden descents by Spanish auxiliary 
cruisers, dashes into harbors by torpedo-boats, 
or any attempts at operations by landing 
parties ; and it should be said here that noth- 
ing was left undone towards providing, with 
the material available, all possible protection 
to the points garrisoned by these volunteer 
batteries. 



FORT PICKERING AND THE "NORTH 
SHORE" DEFENSES 



XI. 



T^KOM this time until the assembly of the 
command at Framiugbam, preparatory to 
going on mustering-ont furlough, the reg- 
imental history becomes that of the widely dis- 
persed fractions, while the record of events is 
but a dull story of ganison duty, faithfully 
performed in the face of every discourage- 
ment. For administrative purposes the regi- 
ment now formed three distinct divisions — 
that under Colonel PfaflF, with headquarters 
at Salem, and sub-posts at the points on the 
!fforth Shore ah-eady noted; the gan'isou 
at New Bedford, under Lieutenant-Colonel 
"Woodman, reporting directly to the command- 
ing officer at Fort Adams, E.I ; and the bat- 
talion commanded by Major Frye, at Foii; 
Warren, under the immediate orders of the 
commanding officer of the defenses of Boston 
Harbor. The record of these divisions, in 
their order, may briefly be given: 

Colonel Pfafi", with his stafE' and attaches. 



130 The First Regiment 

reached Salem on June 3d. Headquarters at 
once were established at Fort Pickering, situ- 
ated on Winter Island, at the entrance of the 
inner harbor. On the 6th, *^C" and ^^D'' 
Batteries arrived at the post, reporting to 
Major Dyar, who had been detailed as post 
commander. The batteries at once pitched 
camp on the glacis outside the wet ditch sur- 
rounding the old fort, while the headquarters 
tents were located inside the parapet of an out- 
work covering the landward approach. The 
fort itself was but a ruin. Since the earliest 
colonial days the site had been occupied by 
defensive works, and the present Fort Pick- 
ering had been rebuilt and garrisoned in 1861 ; 
but from that time on it had been allowed, 
through the storms of a third of a century, to 
crumble into decay. There were no quarters for 
troops, there was no armament of heavy guns; 
and, worst of all, the location of the work was 
such that bombardment under modem long- 
range conditions could not be prevented. 

But Salem, with its heavy property interests, 
its large coastwise trade, and its enormous 
coal-pockets — so tempting to a coal-hungry 
enemj — had to \>e pxoteeX.^^ ^^ \i^'^\» \ss!l^d5^ 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



133 



be ; and, as soon as the camp. had been settled. 
Captains Frothingham and ^Nutter, under the 
supervision of Major Dyar, set their men at 
work, with shovel, pick, and barrow, on the 
feeble defenses. Time was lacking for the 
remodelling of the entu-e work, even if the 
numerical strength of the working details 
had permitted, and work was confined to 
strengthening the weak channel face of the 
fort. Here, from plans drawn by Lieutenant 
Francis, a civil engineer by profession, an 
earthen parapet of strong profile, with stone 
revetment, was constructed. The working 
tools and derricks reqiiii'ed in the undertaking 
were supplied by the city authorities of Salem, 
who in this, as in many other ways, showed a 
desire to be of every assistance to the garrison. 
Guns of at least mediimi calibre were urgently 
needed, and Colonel Pfafi' endeavored, through 
the department commander, to obtain a battery 
of six 8-inch converted rifles. In this attempt 
he was unsuccessfid, though a number of guns 
of this type lay idle at Fort AVarren, where 
they had been dismounted and removed from 
the casemates. "While the carriages of tViefta 
g-ans were not properly adapted fov uaft m a, 



134 The First Regiment 

barbette battery, they yet might have served 
the purpose after a fashion; especially since 
this war, it always must be borne in mind, was 
from first to last a war of makeshift;s. As the 
event proved, however, the garrison at Fort 
Pickering was forced to remain content with 
the armament of small-calibre, rapid-fire guns 
supplied through the enterprise of the State 
of Massachusetts. It so happened that both 
Captains Frothingham and N^utter, prior to 
the war, had been conspicuous for their devo- 
tion to the study of modem artillery work ; 
their men were well grounded in the princi- 
ples of sea-coast gunnery, and their being 
thus stationed at a post absolutely destitute 
of modern heavy ordnance seemed no light 
hardship. 

When such engineering work as was im- 
peratively required had been brought to com- 
pletion, both officers and men settled down to 
the monotony of garrison routine. Lieutenant 
Stockwell was appointed post adjutant, while 
Lieutenant Keenan served in the triple capac- 
ity of post quartermaster, commissary, and 
ordnance officer. Though the health of the 
command was uxvifotrciV^ ^00$^, \JGfc ^afeS^^'sji. 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



137 



officers yet found their time amply occupied, 
since iu addition to their duties at Pickering 
they were required to visit the sub-poste at 
Gloucester, Marblehead, and Nahant. On 
June 24th, Lieutenant Rolfe, assistant surgeon, 
was relieved from duty at Fort Warren, 
reporting immediately at regimental head- 
quarters ; but in July, failing to recover from 
a severe illness contracted during the earlier 
service of the regiment, he found himself 
compelled to resign, thus depriving the com- 
mand of the sei-vices of an efficient and popu- 
lar officer. Later in the same month. Assistant 
Surgeon Bryant received promotion which 
took him from the First, and from this time 
until the close of its volunteer service the 
regiment had but one medical officer. Major 
Dearing, senior surgeon, whose unflagging 
devotion to the welfare of the command won 
for him the gratitude and esteem of every 
officer and man. On July 26th, Captam Froth- 
ingbam, with Lieutenants Nostrom, McCul- 
lough, and Francis, proceeded to Fort Preble, 
Me., for duty on a general com-t martial, mak- 
ing several visits thereafter to that post before 
^^^ Bnnl adjournment of the court. 



138 The First Regiment 

For lack of opportunity at artillery drill, 
attention was turned to infantry work, and 
the garrison was hardened into condition for 
field service by a succession of practice 
marches and field manoeuvres over the country 
in the vicinity of the post. The garrison 
evening parade, held outside the main work, 
was a never-failing source of interest to the 
people of Salem, and on every pleasant after- 
noon crowds came out from the city to attend 
the ceremony. On July 25th, ^^A" Battery 
changed station from iNahant to Pickering, 
marching in over the road with its field guns 
and wagon train. Late in August, ^^B" 
Battery was ordered to rejoin at Salem firom 
its station at Portsmouth, N.H., thus bringing 
the garrison strength up to a battalion of four 
batteries. Such officers as could be spared 
fi*om this post, with many fi*om the other 
posts garrisoned by the regiment, were pres- 
ent, on August 12th, at the funeral of the 
lamented Colonel Bogan, of the Nmth Massa- 
chusetts Infantry, who long had been a friend 
of the First, and had been detailed as its 
inspecting officer while serving on the staff of 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



139 



the battalion at Pickering' performed a sad 
duty by parading as escort, under command 
of Major Dyar, at the funeral of Major O'Con- 
nor, of the Ninth. No further event of 
especial moment appears on the records of 
the poBt until its abandonment on Sep- 
tember 19th. 

Major Quinby, with "K" Battery, under 
command of Captain Howes, reached his 
station at Stage Fort, Gloucester, on the 
7th of Jime. This post, though admirable 
as a camping site, hardly could be considered 
desirable from an artillery point of view. 
The old fort itself, an earthen battery com- 
manding the inner harbor and its approaches, 
had lain abandoned since the close of the 
Civil War, and this long period of neglect had 
brought the inevitable results. Under the 
action of wind and weather its parapets gradu- 
ally had worn away, and its magazine was in 
a ruinous condition. For armament there 
were rapid-fire gmis, supplemented by 3-ineh, 
muzzle-loading field guns turned over by the 
departing militia garrison. Fortunately for 
the peace of mind of the people of Gloucester, 
the fort was not the sole defense of the harbor: 



140 The First Regiment 

for the historic old monitor Catakillj manned 
by volunteer seamen recruited from the ranks 
of the Massachusetts Naval Brigade, lay there 
at anchor during the greater part of the 
summer. With the two 16-inch Dahlgren 
guns in its battered turret, this relic of 1862 
might still have been a factor in any dispute 
with privateers or unarmored cruisers of the 
enemy. It was the intention of Colonel Pfaff 
to secure for this post two 8-inch converted 
rifles, but his request for the guns was not 
complied with. 

There were no barracks at Stage Fort, and 
the garrison went into camp under canvas. 
After settling the matter of quarters, work 
was begun without delay, and the ravages 
of time on the old fort were repaired as 
thoroughly as possible. When everything 
had been put into condition for action, the 
command quietly took up the customary post 
routine. Lieutenant Packard was detailed as 
post adjutant, performing the duties of the 
position until July 18th, when he was ordered 
to Fort Columbus, New York Harbor, where 
he remained on detached service until relieved 
on /September l^tli. M\>eT V\^ ^^^^^Vxsl^^ 1^q«^ 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 143 

the post, the adjutant's duties fell to Lieuten- 
ant Gleason, who already had been acting as 
post quartermaster and commissaiy. On Sep- 
tember 15th, at the request of the city whose 
name ehe bore, the famous little auxiliary 
cruiser Gloucester, with laurels fresh from her 
Tietorious fight with the Spanish torpedo-gun- 
boats Pluton and Furor, made a visit to the 
harbor. As she came to her anchorage, the 
gai'rison at Stage Fort fired a salute in her 
honor; and on the following day, at the recep- 
tion given by the city, the battery paraded as 
escort to Captain Wainwright and the men of 
his crew. 

Captain Lombard, with "B" Battery, had 
drawn what was perhaps the least desirable of 
all the posts falling to the regiment, that at 
Plum Island, eovenng Newburyport and the 
entrance to the Merrimac. After a rough 
passage ai'ouud Cape Ann, he arrived with his 
command at this station on June 7th. The 
island is a low, sandy formation, ten miles in 
length, eonunandiug at its northern extremity 
the channel leading into the harbor of New- 
buryjjort. At this point, lying but three miles 
and a half from the railway bridge mai-ldng 



144 The First Regiment 

the centre of the city, the commaxid pitched 
its camp, and threw up an earthwork of slight 
profile for the reception of its field guns. 
Shallow waters and a treacherous bar deter 
vessels of any considerable draft from attempt- 
ing to enter this harbor; but the city offers a 
tempting and easy mark for torpedo-boat raids, 
and it was to discourage any enterprise of this 
sort that ^^B" Battery was condemned to a 
month of dreary duty among the sand dunes. 
The order of July 2nd, directing the command 
to change station to Fort McClary, Maine, was 
received at the post with delight, and little 
time was lost in preparing to leave behind the 
brackish water, mosquitoes, and monotony of 
Plum Island. 

Before this order could be executed, it was 
amended. These were the days when ugly 
rumors were coming from before Santiago, 
and the Government was making hurried 
efforts to meet a possible disaster on land. 
Captain Curtis, with his battery {^ K ") of the 
Second Artillery, was garrisoning the defenses 
at Portsmouth, of which McClary was a sub- 
post, and to him on July 6th came rush orders 
to hasten with his \>aU.erj \;o ^^xss:^^^ \r^ ysvs. 



Massachusetts Heaijy Artillery. 



145 



the siege train there organizing, while Captain 
Lombard was directed to reUeve hun in the 
command of the Portsmouth defenses. On 
the 8th, " B " Battery reached its new station, 
taking post at Fort Constitution, and placing 
detachments at Fort McClary, on the Maine 
shore opposite, and at Jerry's Point, in the 
outer line of defenses. The command now 
occupied a most responsible position, with 
more than enough work for its small enlisted 
strength, for here there was much modern 
ai'tillery material to be cared for, while the 
guard duty of the scattered posts made heavy 
drafts on the endurance of the men. These 
important defenses, covej-ing not only the city 
of Portsmouth, but also the Kittery Navy 
Yard, were now added to the other posts 
under command of Colonel Pfaff, who on the 
last day of July visited the station, and in- 
spected the works and the garrison. After 
becoming settled in quarters, details were 
made for post administration, Lieutenant Day 
being appointed post adjutant and Lieutenant 
Underwood post quartermaster and commis- 
saiy. On August 19th, the Santiago eaxa- 
paign having turned out luckily aft.CT a\\,C!-a:^- 



146 The First Regiment 

tain Curtis was ordered with his battery back 
from Tampa, arriving a few days later to re- 
lieve Captain Lombard. At this time Major 
Crozier, A.I.G., reached the post on his tour 
of inspection, and by his direction ^ B " Bat- 
tery demonstrated its ability to handle modem 
ordnance by conducting the test-firing of the 
newly mounted 8-inch breech-loading rifles, 
on their disappearing carriages. Shortly 
afterwards. Captain Lombard and his com- 
mand changed station to Pickering, reporting 
to Colonel Pfaff on August 27th. 

The garrison for Marblehead, ^ H '' Battery, 
under command of Captam Pratt, arrived on 
June 6th at its station at Fort Sewall. This old 
fortification, which properly should be classed 
as a mere field work, not only commands the 
entrance to the harbor of Marblehead, but also 
plays an important part in the outer line of de- 
fence for Salem. Having been ungarrisoned 
for more than thirty years, it naturally was in 
a dilapidated condition, and on the arrival of 
^^ H '' Battery it was without armament. As in 
the case of Stage Fort, the request of Colonel 
Pfaff for two 8-inch converted rifles was 
ignored, and reliance \\aQL Yo \>^ ^^^^$y.\x:^\i. 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



147 



the rapid-fire guns brought to the poet by the 
incoming troope. After pitching its camp and 
mating the required repairs on the works, 
the garrison settled itself for what proved to 
be an uneventful tour of occupation. At this 
post Lieutenant Renfrew acted as adjutant, 
with Lieutenant Grant as quartermaster and 
commissary. The only break in the monotony 
of the summer came when a battahon from 
Pickering, after a forced march from Salem, 
feigned an attack on the post by a landing 
party, which was met and repulsed in a work- 
manlike manner by Captain Pratt and his 
command. 

The mining-casemate at Nahaut, from which 
the mine-fields in Broad Sound, Boston Har- 
bor, were to have been controlled, was placed 
in charge of Captain Bordman, who arrived with 
his command ("A" Battery) at this station on 
June 6th, and at once laid out his camp near 
the work to be guarded. Hapid-fire field guns 
were issued to this post, but infantry guard 
duty was practically all that was required of 
its garrison. Lieutenant Pullerton served as 
post adjutant until ordered to Fort Columbus, 
New York Harbor, on July 18th, where he re- 



148 The First Regiment 

mained on detached service until the muster- 
out of the regiment. The quartermaster and 
commissary duties were performed by Lieuten- 
ant Sumner Paine, Lacking the material for 
artillery work, Captain Bordman turned to in- 
fantry drill, and by constant road marches and 
field exercises brought his command into prime 
physical condition. The tour of the battery at 
this station was not destined to be a long one. 
In the rush of emergency harbor-work during 
the early days of the war, the Engineers first 
gave their attention to the mining of the main 
ship channel and Nantasket Koads, leaving 
Broad Sound — the water area for bombard- 
ment of Boston, Lynn, and Chelsea — for later 
consideration ; but with the destruction of 
Cervera's fleet, all active mining operations 
came abruptly to a close, and the Broad Sound 
system remained uninstalled. The post at Na- 
hant, therefore, was ordered to be abandoned 
on July 25th, its garrison reporting at Fort 
Pickering on that date. 



FORT RODMAN AND ITS GARRISON 



xn. 



T^HE second of the three general divisions 
into which the regiment had been sepa- 
rated — Lieutenant-Colonel Woodman's com- 
mand, " G " (Chick's) and " L " ("Whiting's) 
Batteries — arrived at its destination at New 
Bedford on June 1st, reporting to Lieutenant- 
Colonel Haskin, Second United States Artil- 
lery, commanding officer at Fort Adams, R.I. 
The post to be garrisoned was then borne on 
the army register as the " Fort at Clark's 
Point," the designation by which it had been 
known since 1857, when ground first was 
broken for its construction. The fort ia an ex- 
cellent type of the clever military engineering 
for which this country was noted at the middle 
of the century. It ia an enclosed work of 
granite, with two tiere of casemate guns and 
provisions for a third tier in barbette, though 
the guns of the latter battery never have been 
momited. In June last its armament was 
made up of 8- and 10-inch Rodmans, 100- 



152 The First Regiment 

pounder (G.-i-inch) Parrott rifles, and 24- 
pounder (5.8-inch) flank-casemate howitzers. 
All through the summer and fall months 
the Engineers were steadily at work on ex- 
terior emplacements for 8-inch breech-load- 
ing rifles, on disappearing mounts, while 
mortar and rapid-fire batteries also were pro- 
jected for the post; but during its occupation 
by its volunteer garrison the only available 
ordnance was that of the types of the Civil 
"War. 

The site of the works is at the extremity of 
Clark's Point, three miles and a half from the 
centre of New Bedford, at a point command- 
ing not only the channel entering the harbor, 
but also all water areas for bombardment to 
the southward of the city. Prior to the war 
with Spain, a solitary ordnance sergeant formed 
the garrison at the post, but on May 6th a de- 
tachment of thirty men from the Second Artil- 
lery, under command of Lieutenant Lyon 
(later reUeved, on May 27th, by Lieutenant 
Connor), had been ordered over from Fort 
Adams for guard duty. The casemates on the 
Jandward face of the fort, originally intended 
for use as quarters, ne^et \iaSL X^^^t^. ^^^^V\s5l 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



155 



condition for occupancy, and the detachment 
of regulars therefore was quartered in an old 
building standing on the reservation, while the 
battalion of volunteers pitched camp in an open 
jBeld to the northwest of the fort. It would 
have been difficult to find a more desirable site 
for the encampment. Lying on dry and level 
ground, between two arms of the sea, it not 
only afforded a pleasant outlook, but also was 
constantly swept by cool breezes from off the 
water. Under such circumstances, camp sani- 
tation afforded an easy problem, and during 
its tour at this post the health of the command 
remained excellent. 

At this station the post administrative staff 
was made up of Lieutenant J. B. Paine, adju- 
tant; Lieutenant Gowing, quartermaster and 
commissaiy ; and Lieutenant Bryant, sm-geon. 
In addition to his duties as battery com- 
mander. Captain Whiting also performed those 
of ordnance officer, an assignment for which 
he was eminently weU fitted by previous study 
and training. There was much work to be 
done in the early days at the post, for its 
armament, after long years of neglect, was in 
horrible condition. Both batteries turned to 



166 The First Regiment 

with a will, however, and in a creditably short 
time the fort itself was cleaned and swept 
until it would have satisfied the most exacting 
inspector, while guns and carriages were freed 
from rust, scraped, painted, and put into con- 
dition for immediate action. It is due to the 
command to say that when it marched out, on 
September 19th, it left behind it a post which, 
in point of absolute neatness and readiness for 
action, might well have served as a model for 
any artillery garrison, regular or volunteer. 
There was Uttle to be recorded beyond the 
ordinary garrison routine. One incident, 
which occurred during the work of preparing 
the fort for emergencies, is worth relating. 
There were found one or two guns in which, 
at some forgotten period, priming wires had 
been broken off in the vents, eventually be- 
coming firmly fixed there by rust. With this 
fact as a foundation, an enterprising* New 
Bedford reporter built up a lurid story of 
spiked guns and Spanish spies, which went 
the rounds of the newspapers, causing infinite 
disgust to the garrison and endless amnsement 
to the i-est of the regiment. The choked vents 
wore drilled out as sootl «^ ^'e^iox^x^j^^ «s^>^ 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, 



15T 



guns at once made available ; but to this day 
the mention of spiked guns will provoke an 
exijlosion if made in the presence of any Fort 
Rodman artilleryman. 

On June loth, Lieutenant Connor and his 
detachment of regulars were i-eHeved and or- 
dered back to Fort Adams, which meanwhile 
had been reinforced by the Forty-seventh New 
Xork Infantry, a fact mentioned to show the 
straits in which the Government found itself 
in obtaining garrisons for its artillery posts. 
On the 9th of June, Lieutenants "Wilson and 
Cheney served as members of a general court 
martial at Adams. Having been promoted 
major and brigade-sm'geon, Lieutenant Bryant 
left the post on July 8th, to report for duty with 
Lee's Seventh Corps, then at Jacksonville, and 
from this date the affairs of the medical de- 
partment were placed in charge of a contract 
surgeon fi-ora New Bedford. At one time 
during the summer certain turbulent spirits 
among the engineer employees at the post re- 
quired attention from the garrison, but firm 
and prompt action by the artillerymen put an 
instant end to the trouble, and effectually dia- 
•aged any further outbreaks ot aW^e, sot^. 



'^^am: 



168 The First Regiment 

By general order from army headquarters, 
dated July 23rd, the post officially was named 
^^ Fort Rodman," in honor of the memory of 
Lieutenant-Colonel "William Logan Bodman, 
Thirty-eighth Massachusetts Lifantry, who fell 
at the head of his regunent in the assault on 
Port Hudson in 1863. Thus, after waiting 
forty-one years for a name, the old fort at 
last received that of a Massachusetts soldier, 
while a garrison of Massachusetts volunteers 
was on duty to assist at its christening. 




THE THIRD BATTALION AT FORT 
WARREN 



xin. 



T^HE last of the three regimental sub- 
divisions — the Third Battalion, under 
Major Frye — meanwhile quietly had been 
going on with its artillery work at Fort 
Warren. Other than the ordering of Major 
Morris, Seventh Artillery, from Winthrop to 
Fort Schuyler, N.Y., on May 27th, leaving 
Captain Richmond the ranking officer at the 
mortar battei-y, there had been no changes 
in the gan-isons of the sub-posts about the 
harbor. The departui-e of Colonel PfaflF and 
Lieutenant-Colonel Woodman, with their com- 
mands, had rendered necessary a reassign- 
ment of battery duties at Fort Warren, and 
Colonel Woodruff issued orders accordingly 
on June 13th. Of the regular batteries, "C" 
(Schenck's), Second Artillery, took charge of 
the 10-inch rifle and 4-inch rapid-fire guns — 
at that time in process of being mounted — 
in Bastion B, while "Gr" (Brown's), Seventh 
Artillery, had its station at the 10-inch rifles 



162 The First Regiment 

of the ravelin battery. Surplus men from 
these two batUriea, « the Ly reciting 
swelled their ranks, were told off for maiming 
various groups of the older type guns in the 
fort. Of the volunteer batteries, ^^ M '* (Bra- 
ley's) was assigned to the field and machine 
gun sections for the protection of the channel 
mine-lines, Nantasket Boads mine-field, and 
the cable chute through which the entire 
system was controlled; ^^I" (Williamson's) 
went to the 15-inch Bodman guns in Bastion 
A; '^F" (Danforth's) drew the battery of 
10-inch Bodmans on the channel face of the 
fort; while to ''E" (Gibbs') fell the barbette 
and casemate batteries of 8-inch rifles at the 
southeastern angle. These assignments were 
made for a very definite purpose, and they 
remained in effect until after the destruction 
of the Spanish fleet at Santiago, when, to 
break the monotony of gun-drill on one type 
of gun, the volunteer batteries interchanged 
at their stations. 

Since this battalion was a complete tactical 
unit, under command of its own field oflScer, 
it did not lose its identity on becoming a part 
of the garrison at tlae iott. ^qJOcl *^^ ^^^ifc\^ 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



165 



and men, sharing tours with the regulars, were 
carried on the rosters of the post for guard 
and fatigue duty; but for purposes of dia- 
ciphne and administration the battahon organ- 
ization remained intact. The acting battalion 
staff was composed of Lieutenant D. Fuller, 
adjutant; Lieutenant PhUhps, quartei'master; 
Lieutenant Horton, signal officer; Lieutenant 
"Wing, commissary; and, until relieved on 
June 23rd, Lieutenant Rolfe, assistant surgeon. 
The officers of the volunteers also were called 
upon for the performance of many duties 
under post details: Major Frye served as 
president of the post council of administra- 
tion, as presiding officer at ganison com-ts 
martial, and later as trial officer of the 
summary court; Lieutenant D. Fuller was ap- 
pointed post treasurer and librarian ; Lieuten- 
ant Totten was detailed as post adjutant and 
recruiting officer, as well as mustering officer 
for the regiment at large, the latter detail 
requiring many visits to the scattered stations 
of the command; for much of the time the 
signal system of the works was under the 
supervision of Lieutenant Horton, ovrin^ to 
tbe absence on detached service oi lAeuXfeiiaxiV 



166 The First Regiment 

Catlin, the regular signal officer; Captains 
Braley and Williamson, with Lieutenants D. 
Fuller, Phillips, Wing, Harrison, Nilsson, and 
Totten also served as members of general 
courts martial. 

As at the other posts of the regiment, the 
earlier days of the detached tour at this station 
found much work requiring immediate atten- 
tion: range charts for each gun-group were 
plotted; guns, carriages, and equipments were 
overhauled and made ready for action; am- 
munition was prepared and stored at hand in 
the service magazines. Department orders 
called for three hours' gun-drill daily, and in 
addition to this — in order that the command 
might be ready for any kind of service required 
by later developments — an hour more was 
devoted to battalion drill as infantry. Even- 
ing parade was held daily by the volunteers, 
though the regular batteries at the post 
omitted this ceremony. Aside from its record 
of steady and faithful work there were but 
few events during the summer which con- 
cerned this portion of the regiment. On 
August 16th it was presented a battalion color 
by its friends in ^o^toiv, N^rVii^ \\. ^jacmfeSL ^s^ 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 167 

long as on its detached service. Beginning- 
on August 20th, there was test firing of all the 
recently mounted gnns — 12-inch mortars, 10- 
ineh rifles, and 4.7- and 4-inch rapid-fire guns 
— under the supervision of Major Crozier, 
A.I.G., who visited all the posts in the harbor 
on this duty. It may here be noted, as a 
curious matter of record, that poverty in 
ammunition had forbidden the expenditure of 
even a single round fi'om these modern gnna 
until after the suspension of hostilities. On 
September 2nd, the men of the garrison lined 
the parapets and cheered lustily when the 
squadron of nine warships, led by the grim 
Massachusetts, steamed into the harbor for 
the naval parade. On the following day the 
Third Battalion paraded in Boston as escort 
to Captain Higginson, and the officers, sea- 
men, and marines of the vessels under his 
command — the Massachusetts, Machias, De- 
troit, Castine, Wilmington, Helena, Marietta, 
Topelca, and Bancroft. Orders for change of 
station now arrived. On the 17th of Septem- 
ber the battalion tendered a final review to 
Colonel Woodruff, and on the 19tb marched 
out from the fort, taking transport on the City 



168 The First Regiment 

of Fhiladelphia for Boston, and thence pro- 
ceeding by rail to rejoin the regiment in camp 
at Framingham. Officers and men alike left 
the post with feelings of sincere regret, since 
their relations with the regulars of the garrison 
had been most pleasant. On relieving the 
battalion from duty under his orders, Colonel 
"Woodruff took occasion officially to compli- 
ment it on its uniform state of efficiency and 
discipline. 



ill 



B 



xrv. 

CO through the long and weary summer 
months the scattered batteries of the reg- 
iment served faithfully at their poets along 
the coast, patiently enduring the dull mo- 
notony of garrison life, and hoping against 
hope that the fortunes of war yet might bring 
them their own chance for training their guns 
upon au enemy. For a time rumor still 
busied itself with the movements of the Span- 
ish fleet, while spook cruisers still held the 
Beas — ae the men on Shaffcer's crowded troop- 
ships could have testified to their sorrow — 
but, as the final event proved, Spain either 
was too bhnd or too feeble to improve her one 
possible opportunity of inflicting injmy on 
her adversary by strildug a sharp and sud- 
den blow at some point on our long and 
weakly defended coast line. The national 
salute fii-ed on the Fourth of July at all the 
posts along-shore answered a double purpose, 
since, while complying with army regulations 



172 The First Regiment 

for the observance of the holiday, it also 
served to celebrate the victorious fighting on 
land and sea at Santiago. But the men of 
the coast artillery, regulars and volunteers 
alike, listened with heavy hearts to the boom- 
ing of their unshotted guns; rejoicing with 
their brethren of the Navy over the signal 
victory that had been won, they yet felt that 
the destruction of Cervera's squadron had 
deprived them of the one chance to which 
they had trusted for obtaining distinction. 
Like all thinking men, they had to face the 
fact that the events at Santiago marked the 
beginning of the end. 

On July 11th, Governor Wolcott informed 
the authorities at Washington that the people 
of Massachusetts no longer were in uneasiness 
regarding the safety of the cities and towns 
on the coast, and requested that the First 
might be relieved fi'om its present stations and 
.assigned to more active duty. Colonel Pfaff 
also urged that his command be retained in 
service for any work that yet might remain 
to be done, while General Lee, who had heard 
of the efficient eondViiow of the regiment 
througli Liieuteii^aTAr-CjoYoTv.^ C»\3l\^^ ^\SsSl^\ 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



173 



his staff, made strong efforts to secure its 
transfer to his Seventh Corps, then completing 
its organization for the occupation of Havana. 
But the time had not yet arrived when con- 
ditions would permit any further depletion of 
our already weat artillery garrisons. It is 
true that Spahi, after the utter annihilation of 
her sea power, had been humbled into asking 
terms on July 36th, and that, with the sign- 
ing of the peace protocol on August 13th, 
hostilities had been suspended; but there yet 
remained possible complications with Ger- 
many over the long and ugly succession of 
unfriendly acts of which the vessels of her 
fleet in Philippine waters had been guilty. 
"Within a very recent period Berlin has seen 
fit officially to disavow any intention of inter- 
fering at that time with our naval represen(>- 
atives at Manila, but in spite of this disavowal 
it still remains a fact that such interference 
occurred, and it was not until early in the fall 
that our military and naval authorities could 
feel assured that the immediate future might 
not find this countiy called upon to face a 
fresh and really powerful adversary. Under 
circumstances, all our ava\.\a\t\e a'ctSfiaT^ 






done under supervision of Lieutenant-Colonel 
Weaver, U.S.V. (captain First United States 
Artillery), detailed as mustering officer for 
Maseachusette, to whom had been assigned as 
assistants Lieutenants C. C. Hearn, Third 
United States Artillery, and O. EdwardSj 
Eleventh United States Infantry. Slowly but 
steadily the absurdly cumbereome and com- 
plex tangle of " paper- work " was unravelled^.] 
final muster and pay rolls were completed, and 
the thoueand-and-one accounts with ordnance, 
quartermaster, medical, commissary, and signal 
departments were closed. On October 5th this 
work substantially was finished, and shortly 
after noon on that day, in a drizzling rain, thai 
batteries for the last time formed line as a- 
regiment of United States Yolunteere. March- 
ing across the soaked parade, the regiment 
stood at attention while the garrison flag 
slowly was lowered, in token of the abandon- 
ment of the post, and then swung out through 
the main gate of the reservation for the muddy 
march to the waiting ti'oop-train. i 

Reaching Boston at two o'clock, the com- 
mand fonned in column for its final parade. 
By this time ttie drix'^e o^ "OEife IcreeaftisEi. tiad. 



I 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



179 



become a drenching downpour, but the men 
now were thoroughly wet through, and no 
attention was paid to the muddy streets. The 
regiment had gone out under like conditions, 
and was disposed to accept them as part of 
the established order of things. Without 
waiting for the reai'-most batteries to emerge 
from the station, the command for marching 
was given, the band struck up the stirring 
strains of the " Stars and Stripes," and the 
regiment started over its route to the State 
House. Here Governor "Wolcott, with the 
officers of his staff, reviewed the returning 
artillerymen. On reaching the foot of Beacon 
Hill, the Third Battalion halted, while the 
leading battalions marched on and formed line 
on Charles Street. Then the Bristol-Plymouth 
batteries, with arms at port, tramped past their 
Boston comrades, forming line on their right 
and presenting arms as they, in their turn, 
marched by — and with this brief ceremony 
the twelve batteries, as volunteers of 1898, 
separated forever. Colonel Pfaff, with his 
staff, the band, and "A," "C," "D," "G," 
"K," and "L" Batteries, proceeded to the 
^^|u^ Armory, where, aftei' cheeTVQ^ "Oaevt 



180 



The First Regiment 



connnanding officer, the men broke rani 
and scattered to their homes. Major Fryej 
with the Third Battalion, marched to the 
Park Square station, where "I" Battery waa 
detached to entrain at Kneeland Street, 
"E," "F," and "M" Batteries took thi 
special train for their home stations 
and " H " Batteries proceeded by the most 
dii'ect routes to their armories at Cambridge 
and Chelsea. The thirty days' fiu-lough had 
begun, and all active service for the regiment 
now was at an end. 

On November 4th, the officers and men 
the twelve batteries reported back from lea' 
and fiii'lough at the armories at their home 
stations, and the final foi'mality of physical 
examination for discharge was begun. In 
First and Second Battalions this work wi 
carried on imder direction of Captain Nc 
garden, assistant surgeon, United States Arm; 
assisted by Lieutenants Gates and Hitchcocl 
of the medical department. Second Massachi 
setts Infanti-y, while in the Third Battalion 
examining surgeons were Major Magm-n an) 
Lieutenant Shea, Ninth Massachusetts Ii 
fantvy. Owing to tiie amsSi «irii\s'ya?i. ^Xsea^ 



waa I 

h^l 
B-^ 

ist 

ge 

ad 

int II 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



181 



11 



of the command, aa well as to its magnificent 
physical condition, the examinations were con- 
cluded in a comparatively short time, and the 
regiment was given a clean bill of health by 
the board of surgeons through whose hands 
it had just passed. 

The last detail now had been attended to, 
and oil November 14th the First was ready 
for the final step towards leaving the volunteer 
service. Early in the forenoon of that day 
Majors Dyar and Quinby assembled their bat- 
teries at the South Armory, where, with the 
field, staff, and non-commissioned staff, they 
fonnally were mustered out of the service 
of the United States by Lieutenant-Colonel 
Weaver. At the same time Major Frye had 
accompanied Lieutenant J. P. Hains, Third 
United States Artillery, to the stations of the 
" Cape" batteries on a lite mission. Lieuten- 
ant Hains enjoyed the distinction of having re- 
ceived almost the last wound in the Porto Rican 
campaign, having intercepted a Mauser bullet 
in the action at Aibonito, almost at the time 
when the peace protocol was being signed. He 
had become very popular among the officeva o^ 
First, and bis selection as "rausteTm^ crolt 



182 



The First Regiment 



officer was much to the satiefaction of thi 
Third Battalion. 

Of the seven hundred and fifty-seven officers 
and men whose names had been borne on the 
rolls of the regiment during its term of service, 
there were mustered out at this time seven 
hundred and eleven. The regiment Iiad lost 
two commissioned officers — Major Bryant by 
promotion, and Lieutenant Rolfe by resigna- 
tion — and forty-three enlisted men, of whom 
Private Henry A. Williams, " F " Battery, had 
died while on furlough, one had received pro- 
motion, six had been discharged for physical 
disability contracted in the line of duty, and 
the remainder had been transferred to the 
regular service, the greater number of these 
enlisting in the Second United States Artillery. 
Major Deartng was not mustered out with the 
other officers of the staff, remaining in 
service until Jan. 28th, 1899, for duty as i 
amining surgeon with other returning Ma; 
sachxTsetts regiments. 

At this time what had threatened to be i 
serious complication was averted through the 
thoughtfulness of the regimental commander. 
Though the finaV musteT ?ift^ ^a.^ x(i\va ^1 ■< 



1 the III 
th^dj 
es^^l 

tfaa^H 

be^^ 
1 the ■ 
ider. 

1 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



183 



k 



command had been prepared in ample time, 
the pay department, through inadequate cleri- 
cal equipment at this station, found itself 
unable to make the final settlements with the 
men at the time of their muster-out. In ad- 
dition to money for clothing allowances and 
commutation of furlough rations, there was 
due to the batteries over six weeks' pay, a 
very considerable sum in the aggregate. As 
in all other volunteer regiments, not a few of 
the men had returned from service only to 
find theii- patriotism rewarded by the loss of 
their situations in civil life, and cases were 
not infrequent in which delay in fijial payment 
meant serious hardship. Fully understand- 
ing these eonditiouB, Colonel Pfaff relieved 
the stress of the situation by unhesitatingly 
drawing his personal check for $10,000, thus 
making it possible on the day of mustering 
out to advance to each enlisted man §15 with 
which to tide over the interval before the final 
appearance of the paymaster. This thoughtful 
act met with the appreciation which it merited, 
and it hardly need be added that the trust 
shown in the integrity of the men ■^vo'^ed '&c.\, 
'■have been misplaced. On "55o'ievcA:iex \%'Cq. 



184 The First Regiment 

the batteries of the Third Battalion were paid 
off, and on the following day the remainder 
of the regiment received its money — the last 
dollar advanced by Colonel Pfaff being repaid 
at the time the Government fulfilled its obli- 
gations. This, from every point of view, was 
a pleasant incident and one that reflected equal 
credit on the commanding officer and his men. 



AN HONORABLE REGIMENTAL 
RECORD 



II 



XV. 

A FTER bringing to its conclusion another 
eventful chapter in its already long and 
honorable history, the First Massachusetts 
Heavy Artillery again has left the service of 
the United States to reenter that of the Com- 
monwealth. In addition to the jealously cher- 
ished " White Diamond " badge, eloquent of 
its campaigning from 1861 to 1 8{i4 with the 
old Second Division, Third Corps, Army of the 
Potomac, it now has won the right to bear the 
device emblematic of tjcrvicc in the Artillcr' 



188 The First Regiment 

allotted to the regiment was intelligently and 
well performed, and it is a most significant fact 
that of the seven hundred and eleven discharge 
papers issued to its officers and men on 
Nov. 14th, 1898, there was not one which 
failed to bear the endorsement coveted by 
every true soldier : ^ Service honorable and 
faithful/' 

It is much to be regretted that certain en- 
listed men of the regiment, and even a few 
among its officers, since their return from the 
service, have felt constrained to apologize for 
the nature of the duty which it fell to their lot to 
perform. It equally is a matter for regret that 
some of their civilian friends, unquestionably 
through honest ignorance, have made the ab- 
surd mistake of commiserating the command on 
its failure to reach what they are pleased to term 
** the front." While it seems almost a waste of 
energy, it yet may be worth while to note here 
a few facts concerning the functions of the 
coast artillery in the late war, as well as to em- 
phasize the point that any probable foreign 
war of the future will demand precisely the 
same sort of service from troops of this arm. 

In the first place — and so long as the term 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



191 



" front," in its accepted military sense, shall 
continue to mean the point of expected or 
probable contact with an enemy's forces — it 
requires no argument to prove that the First 
Heavy Artillery was at its post, at the front, 
on the 26th day of April, 1898. This, to be 
exact, was fifty-seven days before the Second 
Infantiy disembarked at Baiquiri, sixty-six 
days before the Kinth Infanti-y landed at 
Siboney, and ninety days before the Sixth 
Infantry left its transport at Guanica, at 
which points respectively these three Mas- 
sachusetts commands for the fii-st time found 
it possible to gain tactical touch with the 
Spaniards. In other words, in a war with a 
maritime power, every strategic point on navi- 
gable waters accessible to an enemy's ships of 
war is of necessity at " the front," so long as 
the hostile fleet remains undestroyed, and the 
First therefore justly may claim actual service 
at the front from the day following that on 
which Congress declared war to exist, imtil 
the 3rd of July, when the annihilation of 
Cervera's squadron finally and definitely re- 
lieved the coast from the threat of Spanish 
attack. While the five Massachusetts regi- 



192 The First Regiment 

ments of infantry were passing their earlier 
weeks of service tft inland camps of instruc- 
tion, absolutely beyond the reach of any pos- 
sible fighting, the First Artillery — from the 
very day on which it left its home stations — 
was continuously on duty at vital points open 
to attack at any hour of day or night. This 
claim, it should be well understood, is made 
only in simple justice to the regiment and in 
the interests of historical accuracy, for not an 
officer or a man in the First would detract 
from the hard-won honors of the Second, the 
Sixth, or the Ninth — honors in which, as 
Massachusetts soldiers, they ever will feel an 
honest pride. 

The earlier portion of this narrative may 
have served to show roughly the condition of 
our harbor defenses at the outbreak of the 
last war, as well as the imperative need of 
heavy artillery troops with which to garrison 
them. The time has not yet arrived when the 
whole truth may be told safely, or even with 
propriety, but since the actual artillery strength 
on duty during the war is a matter of easily 
accessible record, it may here receive mo- 
mentary attention. ^rveSi^ ^xxtbhsv^tvt^^^^ ^^^ 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 



193 



were in service for the protection of our four 
thousand miles of sea-coast but ninety-three 
heavy batteries, of which seventy were in the 
regular establishment and twenty-three were 
in the volunteers. Over one-half of the latter 
were contributed by Massachusetts alone, in 
her First Heavy Artillery, and it seems fitting 
again to refer to the fact that her twelve 
trained and disciplined batteries were the 
only ones obtainable from the militia of the 
entire country at the outbreak of hostilities. 
Of the remaining volunteer heavy batteries, 
fom" each were hastily recruited in California 
and Maine, two in Connecticut, and one in 
South Carolina. The event proved that but 
six of the entire ninety-three batteries were 
destined to take part in any actual fighting. 
These were four from the Third United States 
Artillery and two from the California volun- 
teers, which — when the destruction of Mon- 
tojo's fleet had allayed all fears for the safety 
of the Pacific coast — were relieved from duty 
in the fortifications and ordered to report to 
General Meri-itt, under whom they saw service 
as infantry in the land operations around 
Manila. 



ROSTER OF COMMISSIONED OFFICERS 



198 



The First Regiment 



00 
00 



o 





o 

a 
o 

n 



♦ 

« c/5 

<2 o 






o 



00 

oo 



55^ 



00 

oo 



55* 



00 00 00 
O^ O) A 
00 00 00 



I? s? &> 

s s s 

0) o> o> 



A 



B 

$ as 



00 






Oil 

00 
00 



60 



fc* t» ^ 

00 00 0> 
OO 00 00 



S ►? <i 

CO O tH 



8> 



00 
CO 



Oil 



»^ OJ »o 
•"^ CO CO 



^ 



o 






fl fl a 

s s s 

CD 00 00 

O O O 

n n PQ 



g 



00 

I 




CO 

w 
O 

O 

< 

H 
c/J 





m 


• 

00 




A 


A 




00 


00 




fH 


tH 




«> 


»- 




s 


% 




•^ 


^ 




00 


M* 




04 


iH 




•«a 













o 






• 






m 













B 


^ 




d 






o 






m 






00 


00 




o» 


0> 




00 


00 




fH 


iH 




•k 


•« 




►» 


^ 




7 


08 




a 


S 




o» 


0) 




t« 


CO 




00 


00 




00 


00 




•H 


1H 




•« 

s. 

^ 






^^ 


CO 
04 




o 


00 




•"^ 


■"^ 






1 


i 


> 




o 


® 




n 


Szi 


• 




• 




/-N 




• 




M 




^ " 




2 


to 


»4 




>» 




H M 


•^ 


•S 


OD o 


5 


0> 


^■M 


»E 


p 


g A 


o 


• 




H 
O 

g 

m 


1 


H CO 




o 


o 




tn 


CE 


1 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 199 


n 


= = i ^ ifi 
1 1 i=l 


1 

y 

O 

■ 


1 . . - . 

g 

M 


1 

J 


9 May, 1898 
9 May, 1898 
9 May, 1898 
9 May. 1898 
11 May, 1898 


'9 May, 1898 
9 May, 1898 
9 May, 1898 
9 May, 1898 
SMay, 1898 


i I i i 

g S S - 




16 Deo., 1866 
5 July, 1883 
16 Aug., 1887 
UJan., 1886 
8 May, 1690 


s s s ^ s 


S Sg s s s 


n !z 


1 


t 


1 

1 

6 


iiiii 

1 II 1 1 


a : ? 

iiii 

5 CO B P 

11 11 


i! 

■ 


? 

- 1 

■ 


? 

ii 
■ 


■ 


Mill 

g B. -S .= li 
. 1 1 1 1 

CC 1-5 O K ^ 



200 



Tlu Firsi RegimM 





« 


















a 


, , 


. . . 


„ 


, , 


„ 




.... 




^■ 




















































i 




















^ 


- - 


- - - 








- 


- - - - 


a 


1 

I 


















































ills 


















_£ 

A 




Vi 


ni 


s 


Si 


1 


1 


1 1 1 1 


s, 


0) 


0> Ol 


<n oi m 


01 


» Ol 


m 


a> 


» O) o e> 




































ISIS 

S 3 4 ^ 


a 




i i "» 

1 .? a 


1 


II 


i 


1 




































i 


3 


1-. w 


s s § 


, 


(O O) 


„ 


^ 


« — ^ ^ 


CJ UJ 




n « 


" 


OJ 












•s 












1 
1 


1 


II 

•5 1 


li! 


1 


i 1 
1 - 


5 
g 

1 


1 

1 


nil 






















i 
1 


■a 

5" 


a ' 
1° ^ 


u^ 


.2 


^ a 
a 1 

a a s 


' .^ 




Ml 


1 


1 


^ 


? i 


4 1 ■: 


Q. 






i 


■^ ^ s 4 

111 




^ 


» ^ h 


^ 




P 


(^ 


s ^ f 


a 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 201 H 


= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = 


^1 


i 


ill ililiilllill 

1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 
s 






s 


i3gs ggggssssssss 


i 

i 


Boston 

New Bedford. 
Brockton .... 

Melrose 


1 
t. 






Fall Rivet... 
Brockton .... 
Boston 


1! 




r Norman P. Cormack ..... 
Harold C. Wing 
George E. Horton 
Marshall Underwood ..... 


1 


1 

(- 
i 

1 


■ 

Z 
< 

I 

1 


lit 

£ -i S 

J- 1 -^ ti 
1 li 

IIS, 


1 . 
■ 


1 

1 

■ 



202 



First Massachusetts Artillery, 



NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 



KaMB JklTD RAVK. 



SEBOEAKT-MAJOR. 

Huddleson, William D. . 



QUABTEILMASTEB-SSBOBAVT . 

Chapman, Edward E 



HOSPITAL 8TEWABD8. 

Sawyer, George Y 

White, Thomas 

Phillips, Ira B 



PRINCIPAL MUSICIANS. 

Clark, James F 



Beimett, Frederick A. H. 




Bemaiks. 



38 



37 



25 
23 



36 



Hon. must, out, 14 Not., 1898. 



i( 



C( 



(C 



C( 



(i 



C( 



(C 



tt 



u 



45 

30 



Transf. Hosp. Cps, U.S.A., 
8 Sept., 1898. 



Hon. must, out, 14 Not., 1898. 



{( 



tt 



C( 



MUSTER-ROLL OF ''A" BATTERY 

(HOME-STATION, BOSTON.) 



CAPTAIN JOHN BORDMAN, Jb. 
PmST LIEUTENANT E. DWIGHT FULLERTON. 
> SECOND LIEUTENANT SXJMNEB PAINE. 



194 The First Regiment 

After what already has been said, it would 
seem that no elaborate explanation should be 
required to show why the heavy artillery arm 
failed to obtain more brilliant service in the 
last war. It must be borne in mind that its 
first and most important fiinction is the defence 
of coast fortifications; its second, operations 
with the siege train in the reduction of fortified 
places; its third — and this only in rarely 
occurring emergencies — service as infantry. 
In the late war with Spain, as in any fiiture 
European war, it was a matter of vital necessity 
to man our coast defenses, and to keep them 
manned until the threatening fleet had been 
swept from the seas ; that once accomplished, 
and the artillerymen might reasonably have 
hoped for further service in the expected final 
operations at Havana. But with the naval 
victory off Santiago came the collapse of the 
war — and the ending of hope for the artillery. 

By the legislation which transferred the 
First from the infantry to the artillery arm, the 
regiment was deprived of its opportunity of 
foreign service. Entrusted with the defence 
of the coast, it quietly acce^jted the respon- 
iSibiL'ties devolving \v50u \fc, ^^^ ^s^^^* ^^\s^\a. ^ 




Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 195 



way that entitles it to the gratitmle of the 
Commonwealth. First in the field, it had the 
niortifieationof finding itself soonest forgotten, 
for no con-espondentK followed it in its faithful 
service, and no newspaper filled its columns 
with the daily gossip of its camps. Accepting 
the situation, it faithfidly went on witli its 
duties until the end came, and then returned 
quietly to its place in the militia, content to 
apply to its own case the words of its com- 
mander-in-chief, President McKinley, "The 
highest tribute that can be paid to the soldier 
is to say that he performed his full duty. The 
field of duty is determined by his Government, 
and wherever that chances to he, there is the 
place of honor. All have helped in the great 




ROSTER OF COMMISSIONED OFFICER: 



198 



The First Regiment 



I 



♦ 

o a: 
5 O 



« . 

o 
O 



"a 






^ 



00 

00 



o 




O 

• 

-I 

o 
» 



00 
00 



0> 



00 
00 






o 

00 



99 



oo 



tlO 



04 



00 

00 



04 



d 
B 

00 

o 
PQ 






• 




h) 




g 




S 


"S 


o 


2^ 


o 


Ph 







00 00 00 

o> o> o 

00 00 00 



&• S? 5? 

s s s 

O) o> o> 



fc* fc* »-• 

00 oo Q) 
QO 00 00 



k2 ^ <=*< 

S K? ^ 

CO O »H 

04 04 



rH 0> MJ 
^ CO CO 



d d d 
S S 3 

so 00 00 

O O O 

WWW 







c/) 

ft: 
u 

O 

uu 
O 

< 

C/) 



00 



s 



00 
04 

o 

00 

I 

• 

a 
o 



00 
00 



O 



00 
00 



&• 
a 

o 



00 

a 

00 






00 
00 






CO 
00 
00 



& 



t-l 


CO 
09 


o 


00 



d 

I 

o 
W 






^ k * 
^ ^ 




Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 199 



=> S V s 1 
"H a a"a 



I I 



S S S B B 



Ik I I g ^ 

;| s| -J 

I ^ so 3 ^ 





CO 






2 - . , 






jj" 












^ 












S' ■ ■ ' " 


1 




ii 


^ 
















g 


4 




K 








• 










2 2 S 2 2 


^1 




i & !? & 






n 




B 9= m m o 




S^ 


1 1 s i i 




C) 









llll. 


? 


2 "^ 2 ^ " 




z 


3 S S !S 3 


t 




1 ii 1 i 


i 
i 




iliii 


a 

5 






S 




: i : : 


? 










5 £■ 1 a 1 ^ 


1 




^S^if^ 


- 




mil 





200 



The First Regiment 



oo 

00 

► 

o 

S 

d 

o 

w 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOQOOOOOQOOO 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOO oooooooooooooooo 




1 



1^ 

c/5 

y 

EH 
O 



^ ^ S* fe* S* 5^ S* 

s s s a :^ s s 



o» 0» 



mil 

0> O) 0> A A 



S^ ^ ft 

a s a 

A 0> 0> 



00 CO ^ eq ^ ^ lO 

8 00 o> o> A o> o> 
00 00 oo oo 00 00 



•H ^ o» eo "^ 

0> 0> oo Oft A 
00 00 OO 00 00 



•^ CO CD 

^ ^ S 
oo 00 00 



il -^ s >l 4 






0» CO ^ 



CO fc*- ^ CO 
vH i-l i-l 04 



3 ® J if 3 

S QQ P pE< S 

00 1-^ o o 0» 

•H ©« ^ e« 



III 

-^ 00 fc- 
rH 0« 



• 


e<i 


fc* 


:* 


iH 


CO 


o 


iH 


00 


00 


o 


s 


iH 


1^ 


l-l 


l-l 


^ 


•^ 


00 


CO 


CO 


eq 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


U) 


00 


CO 


CO 


eq 



08 
o 



I, 



-5 a 6 w o 



§ s s 

g '§ ^ S 






'2 






% 



-a 



■h 1 i 



08 
0> 






PQ A PE, PE^ 



*H ^ ^ 

3 a> a> 



o pq pq 



i 
3 



tlO 



1 

a 

o 







O 



1 






OD 

o 



a 

08 

a 






QQ 



3 g 



\ I 

^1 



1^1 



PE4 



3 



0? ® 

^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ' " 



i 

QQ 






^ •^^ \ % 



^ ^ ^ 




Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 201 ^H 




^1 
1 


1 

1 




i 

i 


III iiiiiiiiii 

1 If i i i i i i i i i i 

sag S-SSSS32SS. 




s 


sss sgsassggssjss 


1 

1 
i 


kl.1 It 


t 






Fall River . . . 
Broclrton .... 
Boston 


i 

1 1 
1 e 


1 
i 


1 Norman P. Cortnack 
Harold C. Wing 
George E. Oorton 
SECOND LIEUTENANT H. 
Marahall Underirood 


■ 

1 


i 
t 

1 


< 

1 


■lit 

m: 


h 
■ 


Fa 
H 

■ 



202 



First Massachusetts Artillery. 



NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 



Kamb and Ravk. 



SBBOBANT-MAJOR. 

Huddleson, William D. . 



QnABTEBMASTEB-SEBGBAKT. 

Chapman, Edward E 



HOSPITAL STEWARDS. 

Sawyer, George Y 



White, Thomas. 
Phillips, Ira B. . 



PRINOIPAL MUSICIANS. 

Clark, James F 



Bennett, Frederick A. H. 




38 



37 



25 
23 



36 



Bemarka. 



Hon. must, out, 14 Not., 1898. 



45 

30 



i( 



(( 



(C 



C( 



it 



(( 



(( 



Ci 



tt 



Transf. Hosp. Cps, U.S.A., 
8 Sept., 1898. 



Hon. must, out, 14 Nov., 1898. 



(( 



(C 



(C 




MUSTER-ROLL OF "A" BATTERY 

(HOME-STATION, BOSTON.) 



CAPTAIN JOHN BORDMAN, Jb. 

PmsT LIEUTENANT E. DWIGHT FULLERTON. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT SUMNER PAINE. 



204 



Muster-Roll of " A " Battery. 



« A » 



BATTERY. 



KaIO JklTD RAHK. 



FIB8T SBBOBAXT. 

Olaupein, William 

8BROBANT8. 

Dunbar, George M 

Russell, George H 

Murphy, Frank 

Field, George P 

0OSPOIUX8. 

Smyth, James H 

Powers, Edward D. . . . . 
Andrews, George W. . . . 

Howard, Arthur H 

Osthues, Benjamin B. . . 
Brittin, Louis H 

PBIYATBS. 

Blair, Arnold 

Block, Bernhard , 

Blodgett, Walter P 

Bohm, Frederick A 

Buxbaum, Harry H. . . . . 



Age. 



88 

81 
26 
24 
26 

24 
28 
24 
21 
26 
21 

20 
25 
19 
19 
21 



BonarkB. 



Hon. must ont, 14 Nov.. 1898. 



<( 



<( 



(( 



(C 



(( 



(( 



(( 



(( 



(( 



<c 



(C 



<( 



({ 



(C 



(< 



\ 



First Massachusetts Artillery. 



Cobb, Frank E 

Cobb, MsTBton I 

Cook, Tbomu A 

Cook, ■Williftm E 

Cutter, Charlea W. . . . 
Dickerman, Olin D. . . 
SonglsBB, Eugene H. . 
BuggBu, WilliBm J. . . 

Paber, Oeorge 

Goodwin, Frank I 

Heilig, Frederick 

Holt, Edwin B 

Hurley, Jonaes F 

Jennjnga, William 

Kane, Hairy J 

Eeene, Charlea H 

Eiley, Charles J 

Long, Michael J 

Loring, Alfred 0. L. . 

Xoriog, John E 

McGrath, John F 

Bidden, William A. .. 



i.muflt.outpHNov., 



206 



Muster-Roil of "A" Battery. 



Namb axd Ramk. 


Age. 


Remark*. 


FBIYATE8. — CdWtinUtd* 






Sandfirs* Charles ES. .,,,.,,,.. 


21 
24 
21 


Hon. mui 


It. out, 14 Nov., 1898. 


Smith, Fred J. » » - 1 - 


i( li 


Stephenson, Charles E 


(1 »( 


Stoddard, Francis B., Jr 


20 


II 


« « 


Talcott. Norman B 


20 
28 
24 
21 
27 
21 
21 
20 
20 


11 
»( 
CC 
{< 
<< 
(< 
(1 

(< 
(( 


(C n 


Tilden, CaMn S 


C( l< 


Treadwell, Thomas P 


<C il 


Waters. Robert J 


(C il 


White, John W 


II II 


Williams. Charles H 


II (1 


Wilson. Francis C 


II II 


W ishman. Herbert G 


II II 


Wolcott. Rosrer. Jr 


II 11 


PROMOTED. 








Bnmpns, Edward A., prirate . . 

DISGHARGBD. 


23 


2d Lieut. 
7 Aug., 


, 2l8t U. S. Inf., 
1898. 


Eelley, Willard S., mess corp. 


23 


Hon. dis. 


, 28 Oct., 1898. 


Lewis, Irven J., musician 


21 


<( 


12 Oct., 1898. 


Gilbert, Edward J., private. . . , 


20 


<i 


81 Oct., 1898. 


Enoz, James L., private 


22 


(( 


2 Nov., 1898. 


Ladd, James A. , private 


22 


<i 


22 Oct., 1898. 


Quinn, James F., private 


r 


\ 


22 Oct., 1898. 



MUSTER-ROLL OF "B" BATTERY 

fHOME-STATION, OAMBHIDGB.) 

CAPTAIN WALTER E. LOMBARD. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT JOHN E. DAT. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT MARSHALL mjDEEWOOD. 



208 



Muster-Roll of " B "' Battery. 



" n »> 



B" BATTERY. 



Naxb axtd Bahk. 



FIRST SBRGBANT. 

Prior, Percy H 



SBRGEANTS. 

Beanmont, Hartford. . 



Pancoast, Fred L. . 
Litchfield, Allen J. 
Brown, Lewis F. . . 



CORPORALS. 

Jacobs, Edwin C 



Montgomery, William 
Anderton, Thomas . . . . 

Cole, George W 

Lombard, Herbert £. . 
Pritzkow, Emil A 



HESS CORPORAL. 

Balph, William T 



MUSICIAN. 

Coles, Herbert B. . . . 



PRIVATES . 

Backus, Simeon S. . . 




28 

26 
21 
88 
37 

24 
23 
33 
28 
42 
24 

26 

20 

31 



Remarks. 



Hon. must, ont, 14 Nov., 1898. 



Blenerhassett, Holand T A ^\ 



\ 



<i 



(( 



<( 



(C 



<c 



<< 



<( 



(C 



(< 



<t 



<( 



<( 



« 



^c 



cc 



(( 



(( 



<< 



(( 



(I 



« 



(( 



C( 



<( 



n 



a 



a 



Vv 



<( 



cc 



C( 



<( 



c< 



(C 



(( 



<c 



l( 



It 



t< 



(< 



c< 



c< 



■ 


1 


Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 199 


^ 






S 


i i -i 




i 


H 






; 






K 


H 






, 


S B|2 




1' '■ '■ '■ 


i 1 






^ 


1 -ss a 






^^H 








a aja 




\-- ■■ -• ■■ 


} H 






B 


H £ Ed 




K 


^1 


























2 












f H 


^ 


(■^ t^ t^ B^ 




w; >; t^ p^ (^ 


















5 










^H 


" 




' 


» 3 




o. 0= m ov a. 


























































o 










1 









P ^ <1 -5 B 


H 










m 




^1 


^ 


^ 


g. 


m t- 




" 


^ 


" 


n " 


"^ 




f " 












■ 




1 


i 2 

1 1 




l||l| 


i .^H 














^ ■ 














S ■: 


a 


s 


s ; s 






: 1 : i : 




ii 




E 


S a S j 




iifiy 


i| 


is 

n 

■ 


■ 


ii 

■ 


11 51 


■ 


1 Sierra L. B 
Joseph U. I 
Charles Wi 
Norris 0. D 
Albert B. C 


J 



210 Muster-Roll of « B " Battery. 



Naxb axd Raitx. 



FBiYATBa. — CkmUn%ied. 



McDonald, John F. . . . 
McGilyray, John H. . . . 

Morse, Melvin G 

Nay, Frank W 

Phaneuf , Edward J. . . . 
Beynolds, William A.. . 
Bohrbacher, Fritz A... 
Bnddock, Frederick T. 

Bogg, Harrj M 

Sawyer, Elbridge F. . . . 
Thresher, Edwin A, . . . 
Thnrston, Charles E. , , 
Tukey, Charles W., 3d 
White, Frank Le B. . . . 

White, John A 

Waddell, Le Roy 




DISGHABGBD. 

Woodside, Alonzo F., 1st Sgt. . 

Cook, Walter F., private 

Darling, Silas, private 

Newton, Andrew B., private. . . 
Bobertson, William N., private. 



22 
24 
25 
22 

24 
26 
20 
21 
19 
24 
20 
31 
19 
19 
24 
19 

28 
20 
32 
25 
23 



Bemarks. 



Hon. most, out, 14 Nov., 1898. 



(C 



C( 



(( 



(( 



C( 



cc 



(( 



<< 



<c 



l{ 



({ 



il 



({ 



(( 



(I 



Hon. dis., 22 Oct., 1898. 
" 19 Oct., 1898. 
" 31 Oct., 1898. 
" 22 Oct., 1898. 
«* 19 Oct., 1898. 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 201 



sass s^sss 



s B s I a I 



liQC^!^;QF^SPB<t 



il"l |llll-si|ll 






H O M 131 .■? 



I I 






212 Muster-Roll of "C" Battery. 



"C" BATTERY- 



Naxb ahd Bank. 



FIBST SBRGBANT. 

Smith, Herbert L 



SERGEANTS. 

lyes, Henry 

Wilkinson, George M. 
Wheeler, H. Edson. . 
Oakes, Walter E 



CORPORALS. 

Eastman, Ralph B 

Leach, C. Warren 

Hetherington, George W. 

Dawson, Charles A 

Stevens, Percy 

Seavey, Fred H 



MESS CORPORAL. 

Oliyer, John B 



MUSICIAN. 

Hooper, William H., Jr. 

PRIVATES. 

Abbot, Charles E 




23 

29 
22 
37 
21 

24 
34 
21 
29 
32 
22 

28 

19 

23 



Remarks. 



Hon. mnst. out, 14 Nov., 1898. 



Balientine, Harold A A "V^ 



MUSTER-ROLL OF ''A" BATTERY 

(HOME-STATION, BOSTON.) 






CAPTAIN JOHN BOEDMAN, Jr. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT E. DWIGHT FULLERTON. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT SUMNER PAINE. 



214 



Muster-Roll (?/"C" Battery. 



NaMB AMD RAHK. 



Kennedy, Robert J 

Kimball, Clement L. ...... . 

Knox, Herbert 

Land, Lawrence P 

Lane, Edgar 

Leman, James O 

Lewis, Charles F 

Martikke, Ernest 

Otis, James D 

Sewell, John F 

Shattuck, Charles E 

Smith, Herbert H 

Wheeler, Charles E 

Williams, Frank J 

Wilson, Frank E 

Wright, Henry H 

Ynill, Hugh S 




DISCHARGED. 

Hndson, Henry W., private. . . . 
Rink, Frederick W., private. . . 
Thompson, Elwyn W., private. 
Wisnesky, Gnstave M., private. 



29 
20 
21 
34 
22 
25 
32 
19 
20 
2] 
20 
21 
41 
36 
19 
32 
24 

27 
26 
22 
23 



BemulDi. 



Hon. most, out, 14 Nov., 1898 



C( 



« 



(( 



C( 



c< 



« 



« 



(( 



(< 



(( 



{( 



it 



({ 



(( 



c< 



({ 



<« 



(i 



ic 



« 



(C 



C( 



(( 



Cfc 



C( 



i( 



<c 



C( 



({ 



{( 



<i 



(fc 



Hon. dis., 11 Oct., 1898. 
'* 8 Oct., 1898. 
** 8 Oct., 1898. 
"• 8 Oct., 1898. 




MUSTER-ROLL OF "D" BATTERY 

(HOME-STATION, . 



CAPTAIN JOSEPH H. FHOTHINGHAM. 

FIRST LIEUTENAST NORMAN P. CORMACK. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT WILLIAM J. McCULLOUGH. 



216 Muster-Roll of « D " Battery. 



i^T\ >> 



D" BATTERY. 



Namb akd Rahk. 



FISST SBBGBANT. 

Fogg, David H 



SERGEANTS. 

Dobbins, Halbnrton , 



Blaikie, Dnncan S. 
Galway, John .... 
Hanson, Albert A. 



CORPOKALS. 

Martens, Frederick H. 



Hill, Charles F 

Peyton, William H... 

Brown, Frank H 

Gile, Alfred D 

Sargeant, William G. 



MESS CORPORAL. 

Yonng, Calyin E 



HUSICIAK. 

Wyatt,ClandeB 



PRIVATES. 

Adams, Samnel L. . . . 



AshJej, Eugene W 



Age. 



34 

24 
19 
21 
25 

20 
23 
30 
21 
19 
19 

38 

21 



\ 



22 



Bemarks. 



Hon. mnst. out, 14 Nov., 1898. 



\ 



(( 



<( 



cc 



<( 



« 



« 



b( 



(< 



a 



<( 



(( 



(t 



i< 



vv 



ROSTER OF COMMISSIONED OFFICERS 



218 Muster-Roll of " D " Battery. 



Naxb ahd Ramk. 



FBiYATES. — Continued. 
Laws, William B 

Lewis, Charles F 

Mateer, William 

Metcalf , Frank L 

Neale, Robert A 

Otis, George £ 

Bidgeway, Joseph T 

Robertson, George 

Sannders, Edward B 

Spenceley, Frederick 

Stacy, Clifford E 

Stewart, George F 

Stockemer, Charles H 

Timson, John E 

Tinker, Clifford A 

Wells, Roy T 

Wood, Herbert R 

Woodbury, Clarence P 




22 
19 
23 
19 
25 
24 
21 
20 
29 
26 
20 
20 
44 
19 
20 
24 
26 
19 



DISCHARGED. 

Levy, Henry S., private. . . . . 

Marsh, Henry M., priyate • . 

Scherer, August L., piWate 



Swansburg, Jasper, private 



Bemarkk 



Hon. must, out, 14 Nov., 1898 




Hon. dis., 20 Oct., 1898. 
20 Oct., 1898. 



(C 



VV 



w 



\'^^^.>'\sa^. 



■ 


1 


Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 199 


^ 






1 


- 2 rfl 




i........ 


1 






^c 


3 i^s 




s " " ' " 


^^1 




















^ 


S -ffSS 




s 


.f ^ 






















1 iH 




g 


^1 












i 


s 


S 


I i 




S OD S S S 


^^H 


^ 


^ ^ "1 ■! 


























s 






a s 






- 1 


ov 




=" 


D. - 


yi 


« c e= 0= oj 






























































-.1 


1= 


En 


£. 







p ,^ <1 ^ H 


■ 






























s 


s 


S 


^ S 


z 


3 S S S S 


1 ■ 












1 




1 


I 1 
1 1 




l|||j 


i 














s 


A : 


A 


^ 


A : A 






S ! 


S 


5 


S : «■ 






: 1 : i : 


f 
























5. t C- -s 






1 H 


ii 


1 1 

11 
■ 


■ 


i!i5 

^ Si 1 

11 ll 


■ 


= * S ! i B 

mil 


J 



220 



Muster-Roil of " E" Battery. 



»< C » 



E" BATTERY. 



Naxx akd Bank. 



FIB8T BBROBAinr. 

Anthony, Charles E 



BBROBAirrS. 

Peck, Herbert N 



Soule, Ernest L 

Spooner, John C 

Merchant, Ambrose F. 

GOSPOBAL8. 

De Wolf, John C 



Burt, Edwin H. . . 
Gelette, Charles E. 
Wood, William G. 
Adams, John Q... 
Aikin, James 



MESS GOBPOBAL. 

Lafferty, John A 



MUSICIAN. 

Price, David J 



PBIYATEB. 

Aikin, Alexander J. . 



Almond, William, Jr. 




BeniArks. 



SO 

82 
85 
25 
22 

22 
24 
28 
27 
27 
81 

88 

29 

86 
25 



Hon. must, out, 14 Not., 1898. 



Ames, Howard M A ^^ 



\ 



it 



II 



(( 



t( 



(( 



t( 



<( 



It 



(C 



(( 



(( 



(( 



cc 



(( 



^^ 



(( 



<c 



(( 



« 



(C 



c» 



(C 



(( 



c« 



(( 



l( 



(I 



(C 



t( 



C( 



C( 



« 



(C 



tt 



IC 



cc 



<c 



cc 



(C 



cc 



(1 



<c 



C( 



cc 



cc 



Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 201 



aSEH E3SSESKEH 






o u a^ pq Fh 



I I I I 

« S O H 






222 



Muster-Roil of " E " Battery. 



Nams akd Rank. 



PBiYATES. — Continued. 
Merchant, Walter H., Jr. . . 

Murphy, D. William 

Marphj, William H 

Nelson, William 

Roorke, Edward J 

Shiels, James J 

Smith, James 

Smith, William, Jr 

Soule, Charles E 

Spencer, John W 

Sulliyan, James H 

Swain, George W 

Thompson, Michael H 

Tripp, Norris H 

Turner, Samuel, Jr 

Wade, Waldo A 

Walsh, John R 

Welch, Robert R 

Winn, John F 



Age. 



TBAN8FBRBBD. 

Gifford, Edward A., priyate. . . 

DISCHABGED. 

Crapo, Jesse T 



20 
27 
30 
27 
27 
28 
28 
84 
82 
80 
88 
28 
25 
26 
22 
28 
28 
21 
28 

28 



Remarks. 



Hon. must, out, 14 Not., 1898. 



(( 



It 



(( 



tt 



(( 



<( 



tc 



(1 



C( 



(( 



t< 



tt 



It 



It 



(( 



(i 



(( 



(( 



(( 



it 



tt 



(( 



tc 



tc 



tc 



tt 



tt 



it 



It 



tt 



it 



tt 



tt 



tt 



tc 



cc 



C( 



cc 



cc 



cc 



cc 



cc 



cc 



tc 



tt 



tt 



tt 



cc 



cc 



cc 



cc 



(C 



cc 



cc 



To U.S. Hospital Corps, 20 
July, 1898. 



.\ 'i'i y2Lwi. ^\&., 



*ia^\^lA^^^. 



■MUSTER-ROLL OF "F" BATTERY 

(HOME-BTATION, TACKTON.] 

CAPTAIN NOKRIS O. DANFOHTir. 
FmST I.IEUTEXANT FERDINAND Jl. PIin.T.l 
SECOND LIEUTENANT JAMES E. TOTTEN. 



224 Muster-Roil of " F " Battery. 



<« C» 



F" BATTERY. 



Naxs ahd Bim. 



FIB8T 8BSOBAMT. 

Totten, Samuel P 



8BROBAHT8. 

Grigor, Oeorge 

Crowell, Alonzo E. . . 
Potter, William N. . . 
Seekell, George T 



GOSPOBAL8. 

Ballard, Frank A. D. 



Hathaway, Homer C. 
King, Charles O. . . . 

Dean, Frank O 

Brown, James W. . . 
Miller, Ernest F 



MESS GOBPOBAL. 

Dansrow, Frank H 



MUSICIAN. 

Shaw, EbenH 



PBIYATBS. 

Albro, Andrew B. . . , 



Bagge, John J 

Barnes, Benjamin B. 




24 

26 
24 
29 
32 

29 
28 
28 
35 
85 
28 

43 

25 

25 

19 



Bemarks. 



Hon. must, out, 14 Not., 1898. 



cc 



(« 



cc 



(C 



(( 



<t 



C( 



(( 



<c 



(C 



C( 



n, 



(C 



« 



VI 



vv 



V.V 



First Massachusetts Artillery. 



225 



Kamx Ain> Bank. 



PKIVATB8. — Continibed, 
Beaulieu, Sinare 

Brissette, Peter 

Broadhnrst, James, Jr 

Bryant, Charles C 

Butterworth, Joseph 

Chandler, William F 

Cohbett, Willard A 

Creamer, George W 

Dayis, Frederick L 

Dean, Alton L 

Devereaoz, James A 

Dodge, Elmer J 

Dorgan, Michael L 

Eager, Charles F 

Eaton, George F 

Gibson, Charles M 

Gorej, Ambrose J 

Holmes, Charles A 

Holmes, William M 

King, Edward H 

King, Frederick D 

LoTell, Benjamin L 




BemarkB. 



21 
22 
23 
42 
22 
20 
25 
40 
21 
20 
21 
19 
20 
21 
19 
29 
22 
21 
22 
19 
20 
21 



Hon. must, out, 14 Not., 1898. 



(i 



(( 



(i 



C( 



(I 



(( 



(t 



(( 



it 



(( 



t( 



It 



(( 



4i 



CI 



(( 



li 



(i 



i( 



a 



(i 



(< 



It 



<( 



i< 



(I 



it 



(( 



(I 



11 



li 



CI 



li 



ti 



ii 



i( 



(I 



cc 



CI 



IC 



il 



CI 



It 



t( 



II 



II 



It 



tc 



It 



(C 



II 



II 



41 



il 



i( 



It 



11 



(C 



l< 



il 



II 



ft 



C( 



226 



Muster-Roil of " F" Battery. 



Name ahd RimsL. 



PRIYATB8. — Continued. 
LoYell, Horace C 

McVay, Alfred W 

Parlow, William S 

Feirce, Pembroke 

Pidgeon, Norman H 

Bobinson, George H 

Bobj, Henry W 

Scanlon, Joseph 

Seekell, Charles H 

Shaftoe, Thomas B 

Smith, Charles I 

Thacher, William D 

Timms, Ernest H 

Wedmore, Arthur , 

Welch, James A 

White, Darius E 



DIBD. 

Williams, Henry A., private. . . 

DISCHABOED. 

Baker, Arthur H., private 

Baker, Charles H., private 

Dobson, William AMl?tW«*ft. . . 



Age. 


Remarks. 


21 


Hon. must, out, 14 Nor., 1898. 


22 


(< tc cc 

• 


29 


(( (1 cc 


20 


it it (C 


22 


(( « (( 


28 


(< (( tc 


29 


« C( «( 


23 


(( (C (C 


30 


(( (( c< 


45 


(( <t C( 


20 


(( (t it 


20 


(( it tt 


25 


<< (< (t 


22 


« t( C( 


27 


tt tt (C 


18 


(( (( l( 



28 



22 



22 



King, James D., pTiy«Xe \ 'ia 



Boston, 24 Oct., 1898. 

Hon. dis., 25 Oct., 1898. 
" 25 Oct., 1898. 
** 25 Oct., 1898. 



MUSTER-ROLL OF "G" BATTERY 

(HOME-STATION, BOSTON.) 



CAPTAIN ALBERT B. CHICK. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT FRANK S. WILSON. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT JAMES H. GOWING. 



230 



Muster-Roil of " G " Battery. 



Name and Bank. 




PBIYATB8. — Continued, 
McLaughlin, Thomas B., Jr. . . 

McPhersoD, John H 

Merry, Howard L 

Monahan, John W 

Moran, James F 

Nagle, Frank J 

Odenweller, Charles J., Jr 

Pendolej, Frank C 

Beed, Harry J. 

Bogers, George £ 

Saner, Fred A 

Scott, Thomas A 

Snelling, Theodore L 

Spragne, Thomas £ 

Taylor, Fred S 

Todhunter, John, Jr 

Westman, Leroy L 

Whitney, Boy F 

Williams, Benjamin F 

DISCHABGED. 

Hutchinson, Benj. W., private. 
Jones, Walter F., "piwafca 



\ 



20 
28 
20 
19 
22 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
22 
18 
25 
26 
21 
21 
21 
19 
19 

22 
11 



Bemarks. 



Hon. must, out, 14 Nov. 



1898. 



\ 



Hon. dis., 17 July, 1898. 
26 July, 1898. 



(t 



MUSTER-ROLL OF ''H" BATTERY 

(HOME-STATION, OHBLSBA.) 



CAPTAIN WALTER L. PRATT. 
FIRST LIEUTENANT WILLIAM RENFREW. 
SECOND LIEUTENANT BERTIE E. GRANT. 



232 



Muster-RoU of "H" Battery. 



« U »> 



H" BATTERY. 



Naxb ahd Bjlhx. 



VBKST 8SROBAMT. 

Meek, Warren L 



BSBOBAIITS. 

McGilyray, Joseph 6. H. 

Flint, Herbert S 

Brossean, John F 

Smith, Walters 



GOSPOBAL8. 

Brewer, John £ 

Lennox, WUliam W. . 

Beid, Thomas J 

Grant, Nathan A 

Vowles, Herbert E.. . 
Wells, Carl B 



MB88 CORPOBAL. 

Newman, William G. . . . 



MUSICIAN. 

Bnms, William . . . . , 



PBTVATES. 

Adgate, William 




34 

25 
26 
27 
26 

23 
24 
24 
20 
30 
23 

35 

20 

32 



JBearce, Charles F A 'I\ 



Bemarks. 



Hon. most, out, 14 Nov., 1898. 



cc 



(C 



cc 



t( 



\ 



({ 



C( 



ct 



it 



cc 



cc 



cc 



il 



n 



KX. 



it 



tc 



«c 



cc 



cc 



cc 



tc 



cc 



cc 



cc 



« 



cc 



II 



K\. 



cc 



il 



cc 



cc 



cc 



4C 



cc 



cc 



cc 



cc 



cc 



cc 



ct 



it 



First Massachusetts Artillery. 



233 



Name and Rank. 



PRIVATES. — Continued* 
Bird, Joseph F 

Bradley, James T 

Brown, Gordon D. W 

Card, Herbert W 

Chadboume, Walter I 

Cutcliffe, Lawrence H 

Dolliyer, Thomas H 

Durgin, Charles E 

Farrell, Edgar 6 

Fletcher, John 

Gardner, George O 

Hesse, Frederick B 

Hinckley, Charles A 

Holland, William J 

Hunt, Charles D 

Hurd, Thomas £ 

Hutchins, Frederick S 

Jones, Harry £ 

King, Joseph C 

Kirk, Walter E 

Knowlton, Chester F 

Leuchter, Fred A 




19 
22 
80 
24 
22 
24 
20 
19 
81 
25 
23 
20 
26 
24 
22 
20 
28 
21 
21 
19 
28 
21 



Remarks. 



Hon. must, out, 14 Nov., 1898. 



(( 



<i 



i( 



(t 



(i 



(I 



n 



(t 



(t 



It 



u 



(I 



tt 



(( 



(i 



tl 



(t 



IC 



<i 



t< 



cc 



234 



Muster-Roil o/"H" Battery. 



Naxx akd Rank. 




PRITATE8. — Continued, 
Macdonald, Alexander A. E. . . 

McCann, Peter F 

McDonald, Frank 

Osbom, John W 

Pendleton, Clarence A 

Phelps, Charles H 

Phillips, Fred V 

Pierce, Frank J 

Qnimhy, Roland F 

Rice, Harry E 

Rice, Walter L 

Rogers, George D 

Smith, Charlie O 

Snlliyan, Eugene F 

Taylor, Jeremiah 

Tnttle, Adderson F 

Webber, George C 

Young, Roderick B 

Young, William L 

DI8CHAROBD. 

Forbush, Charles F., private . . 
Langill, Robert W ., ptivatft . . . 



21 
20 
28 
26 
22 
25 
20 
26 
22 
19 
18 
24 
23 
22 
21 
20 
20 
85 
18 



\ 



22 



Remarks. 



Hon. must, out, 14 Not., 1898. 



<c 



«( 



«( 



ct 



(< 



(( 



(c 



(< 



(C 



It 



(C 



(C 



(( 



<c 



(< 



(( 



l€ 



(I 



\ 



Hon. dis., 1 Aug., 1898. 
" 1ft Au«„ 1898. 



MUSTER-ROLL OF '* T' BATTERY 

(HOMl^-BTATION, BROCKTON.) 



CAPTAIN CHAKLES WILLIAMSON. 
FIRST LIEUTENANT GEORGE E. HORTON. 
SECOND LIEUTENANT WELLINGTON H. NILSS 



236 



Muster-Roll of «/" Battery. 



€1 I }} 



I" BATTERY. 



Naxb and Raxk. 



FIRST BBROBUffT. 

Rowley, Charles 



8BHOBANT8. 

Allen, William S 

Allen, Herbert 

Sampson, Samuel B. . . 
Burgess, George B. . . 



CORPOBALS. 

Marshall, William J. . 



Beed, Harry S 

Morse, Esrom J 

Abercrombie, George A. 

Varney, George A 

Foye, Frederic E 



MESS CORPORAL. 

Winslow, Enos B 



MUSICIAN. 

Abbott, Frank H. . . . 



PRIVATES. 

Alger, Sanford 



Amadou, Edwin T. 
Angevine, Edgar . 



Age. 



39 

29 
81 
82 
45 

26 
29 
24 
41 
23 
21 

24 

27 

19 
26 



Remarks. 



Hon. must, out, 14 Not., 1898. 



VV 



First Massachusetts Artillery. 



237 



Naub and Rank. 



PRIVATES. — Continued. 
Billington, Edward N 

Burt, Fred E 

Chamberlain, Henry F 

Churchill, Edwin R 

Churchill, William F 

Cobb, Arthur L 

Cook, Samuel W 

Corser, Frank L 

Darby, Frank B 

Edson, Charles H 

Foye, Lewis M 

Gould, Charles A 

Hallamore, Spurgeon W. . . 

Hamilton, William F 

Hammond, Horace B 

Higgins, Franklin R 

Holmes, David C 

Holmes, George N 

Jackson, William G 

Johnson, Clarence H 

Kendall, Thomas L 

Loud, Harry M 




23 
22 
29 
30 
18 
21 
22 
21 
19 
25 
25 
25 
19 
26 
18 
20 
20 
20 
19 
21 
30 
23 



BemarkB. 



Hon. must, out, 14 Nov., 1898. 



(( 
(( 
(( 
<< 
(( 
(( 
<< 
(( 
(( 
(( 
(i 

<c 

(( 

(C 

(( 
(( 
■ (< 
(( 
« 



(( 
<( 
(( 
(< 
(( 
<t 
<t 
<( 

(C 

(< 
« 

« 

<( 
(( 
t< 
<i 



(( 
t( 
(( 
<( 
<( 
<c 
(( 
(( 
<( 
<( 
a 

(C 
(C 

(( 
<( 

<( 
« 

(C 

(( 
<i 



238 



Muster-Roil of " / " Battery. 



Namb Aim Rahk. 



PRITATE8. — Continued. 
Marshall, Walter W 

Maxwell, Harold E 

McDonald, Robert H 

Merry, Hortence B 

Morrill, Joseph B 

Osborn, Chester W 

Packard, Harold E 

Pierce, Charles N 

ProTOSt, Ferdinand 

Reed, Angnstos S 

Shaw, Harry W 

Shurtleff, Fred L 

Slack, William J 

Snow, Harry A 

Stokes, Fred D 

Turner, James I 

Wangh, Prince E 

West, Lybia F 

Williamson, Charles A 




DISOHARGBD. 

Loud, Harry W., private. 



19 
20 
22 
22 
26 
21 
21 
22 
22 
18 
22 
22 
23 
20 
28 
20 
28 
21 
19 

26 



Bemarks. 



Hon. most, out, 14 Not^ 1898. 



cc 



«c 



l( 



«l 



(I 



(( 



IC 



IC 



c< 



c< 



<l 



l< 



(« 



<( 



<< 



C( 



<( 



<c 



Hon. dis., 17 Oct, 1898, 



MUSTER-ROLL OF "K" BATTERY 

(HOME-STATION, BOSTON.) 



CAPTAIN FREDERIC S. HOWES. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT P. FRANK PACKARD. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT ALBERT A. GLEASON. 



240 



Muster-Roil of " K " Battery. 



ii V >> 



K" BATTERY. 



Naxs and Bakx. 



FIB8T SKBOBANT. 

Moore, Freeman R 



SKRGBANTS. 

Chaffin, Walter B.... 



AUon, William C. 
Beady, Frank L. . 
Horton, Joseph G. 



GOBPOBAL8. 

Dayis, Trying J 

Grayes, Elmer A 

Kenny, Horace L. ... 
Farwell, Frank F. . . . 
Donoyan, Thomas J. 
Spear, Oscar A 



MBSS GORPOBAL. 

Barker, Edward, Jr. ... 



MUSIGIAK. 

Bipley, Winfield S., Jr. 

PRiyATBS. 

Adams, Alonzo 




Banchor, George Y. 



26 

24 
28 
23 
35 

24 
21 
20 
20 
22 
22 

23 

29 

25 



Remarks. 



Hon. most, ont, 14 Not., 1898. 



\ 



«c 



<< 



«( 



<< 



<c 



<c 



(C 



<< 



(< 



(( 



(< 



(( 



(t 



v^ 



<< 



<c 



« 



(C 



«c 



<< 



i( 



i< 



(C 



(( 



c< 



(( 



<( 



Vv 



cc 



cc 



«( 



« 



«< 



«c 



(C 



cc 



<i 



c« 



cc 



cc 



cc 



v^ 



First Massachusetts Artillery. 



241 



Namb and Rakk. 



PRIVATES. — Continued, 
Black, Ralph W 

Bond, Alonzo C 

Carle, Edward M 

Conant, Lewis W 

Cook, Angus 

Eaton, Phillips 

Eaton, Pitt E 

Grose, Howard B 

Hally, Edmund S 

Hally, William J 

Hanscom, Alpheus P 

Hazlett, George S 

Jackson, William T 

Jones, Clarence F 

Keith, Phineas 

Eingsley, Charles L 

Erebs, Charles A 

Lambert, Clarence E 

Martdkke, Frederick W 

Mcintosh, Willey J 

McKinnon, William C 

McPhee, George W 




35 
22 
29 
30 
25 
21 
23 
19 
22 
28 
24 
20 
21 
21 
20 
22 
35 
19 
24 
26 
25 
22 



Remarks. 



Hon. must, out, 14 Not., 1898. 



(( 



i( 



(< 



<< 



(( 



«( 



c« 



(i 



t( 



(C 



(C 



(( 



<( 



(( 



(< 



(( 



l( 



« 



<< 



(< 



C( 



242 



Muster-Roil of " K " Battery. 



Naxb An> Raxk. 



PRiYATBS. — OofUiwued, 
Merrifield, Albert F 

Rache, James A 

Reuben, Moses 

Bichards, Frank L 

Bicker, William E 

Bittenhouse, Balph W. E. . . 

Bossell, Oeorge B 

Smith, Asa N 

Smith, Clifford E 

Smith, Daniel 

Smith, Frederick D 

Stock, Charles H 

Strong, Harry C 

Studdert, Edward F. G 

Tornrose, Axel T 

Weiler, Stephen 




DISOHABOBD. 

Canfleld, Charles E., priyate .. 

Chase, Paul D., private 

Moulton, Fred H., private 

O'Brien, John J., private 



28 
20 
84 
29 
24 
20 
46 
29 
21 

21 
26 
22 
24 
26 
20 

24 
40 
20 
21 



Remarks. 



Hon. mnst. out, 14 Not., 1898 



TTebster, Darnel L., piVva\« . . .W'i 



\ 



Hon. dis., 10 Ang., 1898. 
'* 12 Nov., 1898. 
" 16 Ang., 1898. 
" 4 Oct, 1898. 
« 4 Oct., 1898. 



MUSTER-ROLL OF "L" BATTERY 

{HOUE-BTATION, B08T0H.) 

CAFTAIN FREDERICK M. WniTCSti. 
FIHST LIEUTENANT WILLIAM L. SWAN. 
tiEtOSD LIEUTENANT FRED A. CHENEY. 



244 Muster-RoU of " L " Battery. 



(( f >} 



L» BATTERY. 



Naiv and Bahk. 



FIBST 8BBGKANT. 

Graves, William R 



8EBOBANTS. 

Naumann, Lonis .... 



Harris, Clifford L. 
Gage, George R. . . 
Colbum, Alvin . . . 



GOBP0BAL8. 

French, Alton L 



Burrill, William F. 
Far6, Thomas O. . . 
Barrett, John C. . . 
Hill, William B. . . . 



MBSS GOBPOBAL. 

Foster, Maurice F 



HUSIOIAN. 

Barrett, William H. 



PBIYATES. 

Anderson, John E. . 



Babb, Charles H. . 
Bartlett, David H. 




23 

88 
28 
26 
21 

28 
21 
24 
25 
21 

28 



Bemarlcs. 



Hon. mnst out, 14 Nov., 1898 



27 
18 
19 



Blanchard, Benianuxi'B A 'i^ 



<c 
<< 
(( 
<( 

iC 

i( 
cc 
« 

t( 

(( 
« 

cc 

(( 

C( 



cc 



cc 



IC 



c< 



c< 



cc 



cc 



cc 



cc 



cc 



cc 



cc 



(C 



<( 



vv 




Firsl Massachusetts Artillery. 



parvATBfl, — Oonti-nvtd. 

Brown, Chariea H 

Ellis, Henry J 

Ellsworth, Walter F 

FiWwilliam, Edward C 

FitzwlUiam, Frank H 

Flagg, George A 

Frank, Harry M 

Frank, Maurice A 

Frnean, George H 

Gage, Frank A 

Gilleepic, Edwin S 

Goode, Jamea C 

Greenfield, Joseph 



246 



Muster-RoH of " L " Battery. 



Namb avd Bahk. 



PRiYATBS. — Continued. 
Porter, Wilf red H 

Beynolds, Hany L 

Richardson, Charles H 

Bueter, Earl 

RTmill, Joseph A 

Sanford, Herman I 

Scruton, Edwin H 

Simmons, John 

Smith, Harold F 

Soule, Melzer H 

Spinney, William A 

Swartout, Eugene D 

Trask, Harry A 

Warner, Harry A 

Wells, Jaryis A 

Wight, William A 




DISOHABGBD. 

Jansson, John G., corporal. . . . 

Ackiss, lyy W., private 

Johnson, George A., private. . . 
Lewisson, Clarence P., private. 
Miller, William T., private. . . . 



21 
23 
24 
20 
28 
19 
20 
22 
21 
25 
19 
21 
28 
21 
24 
19 

23 
21 
20 
19 
20 



Hon. most, oat 



cc 



<< 



C( 



(C 



<( 



(( 



(( 



(< 



(( 



cc 



cc 



(C 



cc 



cc 



14Nov.,1898. 



cc 



cc 



It 



a 



cc 



C( 



it 



C( 



tt 



ic 



u 



i( 



cc 



tc 



cc 



\ 



Hon. dis., 20 Oct., 1898. 

25 Oct., 1898. 

20 Oct., 1898. 

16 June, 1898. 

20 Oct., 1898. 



ti 



cc 



tt 



tl 




MUSTER-ROLL OF "M'* BATTERY 

(HOMS-eTATlOir, FALL I 



CAPTAIN BIEHEA L. BBALEY. 

PmST LIEtJTENAHT DATH) FULLER. 

SECOND LIEDTENANT FREDERICK W. HABBISON. 



248 Muster-Roil of " M " Battery. 



« M II 



M" BATTERY. 



Naxi ahd Bank. 


Age. 

84 

28 
27 
29 
25 


Remarks. 


FIB8T SKBOBANT. 

Potter* Georse S 


Hon. must, out, 14 Nov., 1898. 

(( i( (< 
(1 (< (( 


SBBGBANTS. 

Sanford, Arnold B., 2d 

McAdams. James F 


Booth, Bichard H 


<« 11 (( 


SimmoxiB, Arthur F 


« (C C( 



CORPORALS. 

Pilkington, Edward H.. 
Whitehead, James M. . . 

Bentley, James H 

Durfee, Frederick E. . . 

Wilcox, William B 

Mitchell, Elmer W 



HBSS CORPORAL. 

Marsden, George 



HUSICLAK. 



Lee, John. 



PRIYATBS. 

Almond, James H. ... 



Bailey, James E. 



( 



27 
28 
29 
30 
25 
25 

27 

33 

23 
^0 



\ 



(t 



<t 



u 



(( 



i( 



« 



(( 



(( 



(< 



(( 



(t 



c< 



i( 



i( 



<i 



(( 



C( 



i( 



« 



(I 



(( 



t( 



<« 



li 



(( 



(( 



<( 



(< 



u 



c< 



First Massachusetts Artillery. 



249 



Name Ain> Rank. 




PBIYATB8. — Continued, 
Bradbury, George 

Bridges, Charles 

Broughton, Thomas 

Buckley, John 

Buckley, Zedekiah 

Chippendale, Thomas J 

Dale, Hugh 

Darke, William H 

Davis, Elmer F 

Destremps, Henry A 

Durfee, Nelson B 

Eldredge, Myron O 

Ely, Ernest E 

Fish, Edwin B 

Fiske, Frank R 

Graham, Henry 

Harrison, Paul 

Henshaw, John E 

Heywood, Joseph A 

Horan, James H 

Horsman, Frederick 

Hughes, John F 



25 
24 
35 
19 
81 
19 
25 
38 
25 
21 
28 
23 
21 
28 
23 
34 
40 
23 
35 
27 
38 
31 



Remarks. 



Hon. must, out, 14 Nov., 1898. 



« 
<< 

<( 
<( 
(( 
(( 
<< 
<( 
(( 
<( 
<( 

(C 

(i 
« 
(« 

(C 

ii 



(t 



• (t 



(t 



(( 



<( 



(( 



(( 



tc 



t( 



<( 



C( 



(( 



(C 



(C 



(( 



(( 



t( 



(( 



(« 



C( 



(( 



(i 
(( 

C( 
C( 

(< 
(( 
(( 
a 
<< 
(I 

C( 

(( 
<( 

(( 
<< 
c« 
(( 

« 



260 



Muster-Roil of " M " Battery. 



Naxb and Rahk. 



PRiYATBS. — Continued, 
Lindsey, John J 

Linley, Frederick B. H 

Littlefleld, Frank W. C 

McGlynn, Thomas J 

McGraw, Jerome G 

Murphy, Thomas 

Rigby, John 

Bobinson, John T 

Sanf ord, Alyin C 

Sanford, Frank B. 

Sharpies, Joseph H. M 

Simmons, Ernest L 

Skinner, Harry A 

Smolensky, Hyman. : 

Smolensky, Lester H 

Squire, William B 

Sterens, Theodore F 

Thurston, Edward A 

Waterworth, William 

Wiseman, William A 

Wood, Bichard 



Age. 



28 
25 
28 
25 
27 
84 
22 
25 
19 
21 
27 
19 
22 
24 
21 
19 
19 
26 
25 
21 
86 



Hon. most out» 14 Nov., 1898. 



(( 

cc 

Ci 
C( 

(( 
(< 
(C 

(( 
(( 
(( 
(( 
t( 

C( 

cc 

(C 

cc 
(( 
cc 
cc 



(( 



cc 



(C 



cc 



l( 



cc 



(c 



cc 



(C 



cc 



(( 



cc 



cc 



cc 



(C 



cc 



C( 



tt 



cc 



<c 



CHRONOLOGY OF THE WAR 



CHRONOLOGY. 

It will be observed that in the following 
table all regimental and batteiy notes refer 
to the Fu'st Massachusetts Heavy Artillery: 

FEBRUARY, J898. 

15tli. — U.S.S. Maine destroyed in harbor of Havana. 
MARCH. 
9tii. — Congress appiopnates $50,000,000 for national 

defence. 
12tli. — U.S.S. Oregon starts from San Francisco on the 

memorable voyage to the Atlantic coast. 
24th. — Spanish toipedo-gunboat Sotilla assembles at 

Cape Verde Islands. 
28th. — Congress receives report of naval board of inquiry 

declaring Maine to have been destroyed by 

exterior explosion. 

APRIL. 
9th. — General Lee leaves Havana. 
14th. — FlotUla at Cape Verde Islands joined by Infanta 

Maria. Teresa and Cristobal Colon. 
15th. — Legislature of Massachusetts appropriates 
$600,000 for local defence and equipment of 
troops. 

S58 



254 Chronology of the War. 

20tlL — Cape Verde squadron augmented by Almirante 
Oquendo and Vizcaya. 

21st. — Spanish Government sends passports to Minister 
Woodford. 

22d. — Admiral Sampson sails from Key West to estab- 
lish Cuban blockade. 

23d. — President McKinley calls for one hundred and 
twenty-five thousand volunteers. 

24th. — Spanish Grovemment announces its intention of 
organizing a fleet of auxiliary cruisers. 
Eegiment receives orders to hold itself in readi- 
ness for service in defenses of Boston Harbor. 

25th. — Congress declares war to have existed since 21 
April. 
Admiral Dewey sails from Hong Kong for 

Manila. 
Orders issued directing regiment to report at 
Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, on following 
day. 

26th. — Eegiment assembles in Boston — ninety-nine per 
cent, present for duty — passes in review before 
Grovemor Wolcott, and at noon reaches its 
station. 

29th. — Spanish fleet, under Admiral Cervera, sails from 
Cape Verde Islands — destination unknown. 

MAY» 

1st. — Destruction of Admiral Montojo's fleet in Manila 

Bay. 
9tli. — Eegiment m\3kS\«t^^ visto ^OiSKDiwy^t ^^rvlce of 

United ataX^a \s5 "^^^"^^"^ ^Y^x^i;^Ou ^. ^ 



First Massachusetts Artillery. 255 

Woodruff, Second United States Artillery; 
muster-in completed at 9.34 A.M. 

10th. —Orders received detaching Third Battalion, to 
report to Colonel WoodrufE. 

13th. — Reported sighting of Spanish fleet off Nan- 
tucket; night alarm at Port Warren. 

18tli. — GrOTemor Wolcott visits post, inspects regiment, 
and presents volunteer commissions to of&cers. 

20th. — General Merritt, commanding Department of the 
East, relieved by General Erant. 

23d. — Orders received assigning Headquarters, Krst 
and Second Battalions to stations. 

24th. — U.S.S. Oregon reaches coast of Florida. 

25th. — President McKinley calls for seventy-five thou- 
sand additional volunteers. 
First military expedition stai-ts from San Fran- 
cisco for Manila. 

30th. — Admiral Cervera's fleet definitely located and 
blockaded in harbor of Santiago. 



JUNE. 

lat. — "G" and "L" Batteries take station at Fort 

Kodman, New Bedford Harbor. 
3d. — U.S.S. Merrtmac sunk in harbor of Santiago. 

Regimental Headquarters established at Fort 

Pickering, Salem Harbor. 
6th. — Changes of station: "A" Battery to Mining 

Casemate, Nahant; "C" and "D" Batteries 

to Fort Pickering; "H" Battery to Fort 

Bewail, Marblehead Harbor. 



256 Chronology of the War. 

Tth. — "B" Battery takes station in defenses of New- 

buryport Harbor ; " K '^ Battery at Stage Fort, 

Gloucester Harbor, 
nth. — Landing of United States Marines at Guanta- 

namo. 
12tli. — Embarkation of General Shafter's corps at 

Tampa. 
ISth. — Admiral Gamara's squadron sails from Cadiz. 
20tlL — General Shafter's expedition lands at BaiquirL 
24th. — Action at Las Guasimas. 

28th. — General Merritt's expedition sails for Philippines. 
30th. — General Erank^ commanding Department of the 

East, relieved by General Gillespie. 



JULY. 

lst-2d. — Actions at El Caney and San Juan Hill. 
3d. — Annihilation of Admiral Cervera's fleet off Santi- 
ago. 
8th. — Admiral Camara's fleet turns back to Cadiz. 

"B" Battery changes station from defenses of 
Newburyport to Fort Constitution, Portsmouth 
Harbor, New Hampshire. 
11th. — (Jeneral Miles arrives at Santiago. 

Governor Wolcott requests foreign service for 
regiment, informing War Department that 
apprehension no longer is felt for coast-towns 
of Massachusetts. 
17th. — Surrender of Santiago. 

25th.. — General Milea AaaiflLa m^^ii'^ ^^^^5i!i!stf5^m Porto 
Bico. 



First Massachusetts Artillery. 



257 



"A" Battery chaugea station from Nahant to 

Fort Pickering. 
26th. — Spain aaks terms of peace, 
39th. — General Merritt's expedition reaches Manila. 
31at. — United States forces at Manila, repulae Spauisli 

attack. 

AUGUST. 

12th. — Peace protocol signed ; hostilities suspended. 
27tlL — "E" Battery changes station from Fort Consti- 
tution to Fort Pickering. 

SEPTEMBER. 
19tb. — Regiment withdrawn from coast-works and 
assembled ia camp at South Framiugbam. 

OCTOBER. 
4th. — .General Gillespie, commanding Department of 

the East, relieved by General Shaffer, 
5th. — Regiment breaks camp at Framingham, takes 

transportation for Boston, marches in review 

before Governor Wolcott, and is fnrlocghed 

for thirty days. 



NOVEMBER, 
4th. — Batteries report at home stations from furlough. 
14th. — Eegiment mustered out of service of United 
States by Lieut-Col. E. M. Weaver, U.S.V., 
aud Lieut J. P. Hai&s, IT.S.A. 



258 Chronology of the War. 

DECEMBER* 

loth. — Treaty of peace signed by Commissioners at 
Paris. 

APRIL, J899» 

11th. — Proclamation by President McKinley of ratifi- 
cation of treaty officially terminates the war. 



E 72e.M4.Fg C.1 

Tha Rrat R«9lm«nt Uassachutet 
Stanford University UbrartM 

iiHiiiiiii 

3 6105 036 221 708 



AiyF<